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Daisy Chains.

7/19/2005

Here's another nice story by Jenny Jane Pope. Her stories
are fun & make some of wish we could have been there
<br>
<br>

Hugs,
<br>
<br>

Terri Anne.
<br>
<br>

-------------------------------------------
<br>
<br>

He came upon the small clearing quite unexpectedly, a perfect
circle of short cropped grass, perhaps twenty metres in
diameter, amidst the thickest part of the wood. The early
afternoon sun lit the little haven brilliantly and there
was a heavy, sweet smell in the air that he presumed was something
to do with the circle of tiny white daisies that occupied
the very centre of the area.
<br>
<br>

There were thousands of the little flowers, an unbroken
rug of orange and white atop an equally perfect carpet of
green, though with an even smaller circle of a darker, almost
mauve coloured grass at the very centre again. Like a Polo
mint, Tim thought and smiled to himself.
<br>
<br>

Unhurriedly, he strolled around the perimeter of the grass,
marvelling at how even the definition between woods and
grass was, as though someone had deliberately cut back
trees and undergrowth to form the clearing and yet there
were no signs of stump remnants, nor any indication that
anyone had recently been digging here to remove such things.
The clearing, natural or man-made, had been here a long
time.
<br>
<br>

Slowly, Tim lowered himself to the ground and reached into
the pocket of his jacket for his cigarettes. He took it out,
flipped the top and extracted a single filter tip.
<br>
<br>

`You don't want to do that.' Tim's hand froze,
halfway to his mouth, at the unexpected sound of the light,
musical, feminine voice and he looked up to see her. She
was standing in the dark central circle, within the daisies,
yet he had scarcely looked down for more than a handful of
seconds. He narrowed his eyes against the glare of the sun,
slightly dazzled by the sheer whiteness of her long, flowing
summer dress and her halo of ash blonde curls..
<br>
<br>

`I'm sorry, ' she said, stepping towards him,
`I didn't mean to startle you, but you really shouldn't
be doing that.' She drew closer and now he could make
out her features more clearly. Under his breath, Tim let
out a low whistle of admiration, for the girl was one of the
most beautiful creatures he had ever seen.
<br>
<br>

`Smoking kills more human beings than just about anything
else, ' the girl continued. `Everybody knows that,
even from childhood and yet still people persist in committing
suicide.'
<br>
<br>

`It's a bit late as far as I'm concerned, '
Tim said. The tightness in his chest and the stabbing pains
suddenly felt even more acute. His hand hovered over his
pocket, where he knew there were just three more tablets
remaining of that day's quota.
<br>
<br>

`It's never too late, ' the girl said. She stopped
and lowered herself gracefully to the grass, only a few
feet from him. Tim saw that her eyes were a brilliant, but
very deep green, with tiny amber - almost gold - flecks.
He shook his head.
<br>
<br>

`Tell that to my doctors, ' he said. `According to
them, nothing works. I've tried it all.' He ran
a hand over his gleaming pate. `This hairless look isn't
a fashion statement, you know.'
<br>
<br>

`Yes, I do know, ' she replied, seriously.
<br>
<br>

`How do you know?' Tim challenged her. `Or were you
just putting two and two together?' It probably wasn't
that hard to work out, he reasoned. The lack of hair, his
haggard looking features and the weight had been dropping
off his sparse frame at an ever alarming rate these past
two or three weeks.
<br>
<br>

`I know a lot of things, ' the girl said, smiling gently
back at him. `You'd be surprised.'
<br>
<br>

`I doubt it.' Tim sighed and returned her smile. `Nothing
would surprise me these days.'
<br>
<br>

`So cynical in one still so young, ' his new companion
laughed. Her face suddenly became serious again. `And
yet, I suppose it's hardly unexpected, considering
everything you've been through.'
<br>
<br>

`Oh, you don't know the half of it, ' Tim grunted.
<br>
<br>

`As I said, ' she replied, `you'd be surprised
at what I know.' She paused. `In fact, I know quite a
bit about you, Tim.' Tim's eyebrows shot up at
the use of his name.
<br>
<br>

`How did you know my name?' he demanded. The girl shrugged
and even that was a graceful gesture.
<br>
<br>

`Oh, friends in places, ' she replied.
<br>
<br>

`And have you been following me all the way through the woods?'
<br>
<br>

`No, there was no need. I just waited for you to come.'
Tim's eyes narrowed once more, but this time it was
nothing to do with the brightness of the day. And, despite
the warmth of the early afternoon, he was beginning to feel
curiously cold.
<br>
<br>

`You waited for me?' Tim repeated. `How did you know
I would come?'
<br>
<br>

`I just knew, ' she said, her smile widening. `Some
things just have to happen.' She stretched out a hand
to him. `My name is Beatrix, by the way - with an `x' on
the end.'
<br>
<br>

`Nice to meet you, Beatrix, I'm sure, ' Tim replied,
taking the proferred fingers. They were cool to the touch,
but seemed to then convey a warmth into his arm. `But that
still doesn't explain why you were waiting for me,
let alone how you could be so sure I would come anyway.'
<br>
<br>

Beatrix looked over her shoulder and nodded towards the
circle of flowers.
<br>
<br>

`The daisies, ' she said, as if that explained everything.
`You came for the daisies.'
<br>
<br>

`But I didn't even know they were here, ' Tim replied,
puzzled not just by her words, but by the way in which she
seemed to assume he would understand them. `In fact, I only
found this clearing by accident. I wandered off the main
pathway and then got a bit lost. At one stage, the undergrowth
just seemed to get thicker and thicker, the further in I
went and then suddenly I was here.
<br>
<br>

`You wouldn't happen to know the way out, I suppose?'
he added, for he had visions of spending hours thrashing
around in ever bewildering circles, once he tried to start
back again.
<br>
<br>

`The way is always there for those who need to know it, '
Beatrix replied, mysteriously. Tim sighed. Beautiful
as this girl was, he was beginning to think that maybe she
was some kind of head case. `You think I'm a bit strange,
'
she said and Tim stiffened.
<br>
<br>

`No, not really, ' he denied. `But, well, you know,
it is a bit strange meeting someone like you all the way out
here and you do say some funny things.' Beatrix's
smile became positively radiant.
<br>
<br>

`Someone like me?' she said. `And exactly what is `someone
like me?''
<br>
<br>

`Well, I don't really know, I suppose, ' Tim confessed.
`It's just that you're like, well, like some sort
of latter day hippy, I guess. You remind me a bit of the mother
of one of the girls I knew at college. She was into tarot cards
and astrology and herbal remedies and the like and she used
to talk in riddles half the time.
<br>
<br>

`She claimed she was a medium and that she was mostly just
passing on wisdom from beyond the veil, as she called it.'
<br>
<br>

`Well, I'm not a medium, ' Beatrix said. `And
I don't believe in tarot cards, nor all that star sign
nonsense. However, the veil is a different matter.'
<br>
<br>

`It is?'
<br>
<br>

`Of course, ' Beatrix replied, firmly. `There are
many names for it, but it exists, as sure as we're sitting
here.'
<br>
<br>

`Do you get messages from beyond the veil, then?' Tim
tried to keep the sarcasm from his voice and fought to keep
a straight face. Beatrix shook her head.
<br>
<br>

`I don't get them, ' she said. `But I sometimes
bring them.'
<br>
<br>

`What?' This time Tim could not control his features
and it was all he could do not to laugh out loud. `You bring
messages from beyond the veil. What are you, some kind of
spiritual Postman Pat?' Instantly, he regretted
the final remark, but Beatrix did not seem offended at all.
<br>
<br>

`That's quite a good analogy, ' she nodded. `But
I don't have a black and white cat, I'm afraid.'
<br>
<br>

`But you obviously have television beyond the veil, or
whatever it's called, ' Tim grinned. Beatrix
let out a little laugh, which tinkled merrily in the air
above them.
<br>
<br>

`I don't spend all my time there, ' she said. `We
have to live among humans from time to time, like a sort of
refresher course, I suppose you'd call it. Otherwise,
we would tend to lose touch with what's going on, despite
the fact there are other ways to monitor things. There is
still no substitute for what they now call hands on experience.'
<br>
<br>

`So, my Postwoman Beatrix, ' Tim said, `what exactly
are you? Are you an angel? You're certainly beautiful
enough.' Beatrix made a little face.
<br>
<br>

`I'm glad you think so, ' she said. `Thank you.
But no, I'm not an angel, not if you mean in the biblical
sense. Angels don't really exist in that way. The biblical
description was just a handy one to explain to a civilisation
that was really very uneducated at that time.
<br>
<br>

`People needed something to believe in that was positive
and good and that's how the Bible came about. It's
probably the greatest work of fiction of all human time,
but that's all it is.'
<br>
<br>

`How can you be so sure?' Tim demanded.
<br>
<br>

`Because I helped write some of it, ' Beatrix retorted,
her smile suddenly a wicked grin. `Not much, it's true
and none of the very important bits, but I did help.'
<br>
<br>

`Oh, so you didn't invent Christmas and Easter and
all that stuff?' Tim laughed, catching the lightness
of her mood, but her face went serious again as soon as he
had spoken.
<br>
<br>

`No one invented that, ' she said, firmly. `The New
Testament is pretty much accurate. I was only talking about
the Old Testament.'
<br>
<br>

`So there really was a man called Jesus?'
<br>
<br>

`Jesus most certainly existed, ' Beatrix agreed,
`though to describe him as a man would be less than accurate.'
<br>
<br>

`You mean he came from where you come from?'
<br>
<br>

`Of course. There was no point in going to all that trouble
over the Old Testament and then not fulfilling the prophecies.'
<br>
<br>

`But people didn't believe it, did they. The poor beggar
ended up nailed to a cross.'
<br>
<br>

`That was the whole point, though, wasn't it? I admit
I couldn't see the point at the time, but then I'm
not one of the decision makers. And I reckon I was proved
right in some ways, especially in the middle ages and that.
Religion has caused nearly as many painful deaths as smoking
and that's a fact.'
<br>
<br>

`So, if you're not an angel, what exactly are you?'
Tim asked. He was beginning to think he was losing the thread
and he was growing steadily more sure that this girl was
a brick or two short of a chimney, but the sound of her voice
was almost mesmerising and he hadn't been able to take
his eyes off her since she had first appeared.
<br>
<br>

`Well, ' Beatrix replied, slowly, `I suppose I'm
what people once described as a fairy. Some people do still
believe in us, of course. All this would be far simpler if
you were Irish, in fact.'
<br>
<br>

`A fairy, eh?' Tim said. `Not a fairy queen, by any chance?'
Beatrix shook her head and the sunlight danced amidst her
curls.
<br>
<br>

`Oh my goodness, no!' she exclaimed. `There are only
seven of them. I'm not even a princess, although I suppose
in human terms I'd probably rate as a very minor countess.
But that's not important, as we don't do things
the same way back there.'
<br>
<br>

`I'll bet you don't, ' Tim agreed. `So, Countess
Postwoman, what brings you here today?'
<br>
<br>

`You, ' Beatrix replied, simply. `You and that horrendous
tumour that's eating away at your lungs, not to mention
the smaller ones that are even now forming on your liver,
kidneys and pancreas.'
<br>
<br>

`You seem to know even more than the doctors, ' Tim
retorted. `They never said anything about smaller tumours.'
<br>
<br>

`Because they don't yet know, ' Beatrix said.
`Your last x-ray was nearly two weeks ago.'
<br>
<br>

`How did - ?' Tim began, but stopped short. `Okay, you
just know.' He considered for a moment. `Thanks for
the good news, ' he continued, eventually. `I knew
I didn't have that long to go, but if my liver goes, it'll
be even sooner than I'd hoped. They did say it was a likely
prognosis.'
<br>
<br>

`The good news is that you don't have to die at all, '
Beatrix said, very quietly. Tim stared at her, a sudden
rush of anger threatening to overwhelm him.
<br>
<br>

`That's not bloody funny!' he snapped. `The chance
of any remission passed months back. In fact, they're
amazed I've even lasted this long. Without the chemo,
I'd be dead already, but even that can only slow things
so long.'
<br>
<br>

`I can understand you reacting like that, ' she said.
`But I am not making some awful joke at your expense. I really
can help you.'
<br>
<br>

Tim sighed, heavily and leaned backwards, stretching
out his arms to take his weight. His patience was rapidly
becoming exhausted. A few moments ago, he had been enjoying
this girl's company, quite prepared not to let her
extravagant tissue of lies upset him, in exchange for the
pleasure that seeing and listening to her had been giving
him, but now she was beginning to grate on him.
<br>
<br>

`Listen, lady, ' he said, through gritted teeth,
`I've been seen by every bloody Tom, Dick and over-qualified
Harry in the medical profession, so what the hell do you
think you can do?'
<br>
<br>

`Can I ask you a question? Do you know, ' she continued,
without waiting for an answer, `where my name, Beatrix,
comes from?'
<br>
<br>

`I presume it's nothing to do with that other teller
of fairytales, ' Tim sneered. `Not if you're
supposed to be three or four thousand years old, as you claim.'
<br>
<br>

`Nearer five, actually, ' Beatrix said, brightly,
`but more of that later. No, Tim, my name means `Bringer
of Joy' and that's what I can do for you. But, in
return, I need something from you.'
<br>
<br>

`Money?' She shook her curls again.
<br>
<br>

`Don't be silly; I can have any amount of money I need.
No, I need you to do something very personal for me. I need
you to make love to me.'
<br>
<br>

Tim only just managed to stop himself from toppling backwards.
<br>
<br>

`What?' he squeaked. `You mean as in having sex?'
Beatrix nodded, solemnly.
<br>
<br>

`As in having sex, ' she confirmed. Tim was at a loss.
<br>
<br>

`But why?' he almost choked. `I mean, don't get
me wrong, a man would have to be mad not to fancy you like crazy,
but we've only just met.'
<br>
<br>

`No, you've only just met me, ' Beatrix corrected
him. `I've been quite close to you for some time.'
<br>
<br>

`Same difference, as far as I'm concerned, '
Tim retorted. Beatrix's smile returned again.
<br>
<br>

`Quite old fashioned, really, aren't you?' she
said. `But I am serious. You see, I am only a few months - human
months, that is - away from what in your terms would be my
five thousandth birthday and I have to mate to produce my
offspring, otherwise I will very quickly die.'
<br>
<br>

`I thought fairies only died when people - children - stopped
believing in them, ' Tim quipped. He was beginning
to see a definite plus side to the latest turn of events.
<br>
<br>

`Oh, fairies can die all right, ' Beatrix assured
him. `Only we generally manage to avoid it, if we're
sensible. And I am most definitely sensible. That is why
I am asking you if you will mate with me. If you do, you will
also become immortal, exactly the way I am.'
<br>
<br>

`Yeah? You don't say?' Again, Tim could not hide
the smile on his face. `You mean I live forever, cancer or
no cancer?'
<br>
<br>

`That's it, exactly.' Tim shrugged.
<br>
<br>

`Well, I guess I've got nothing to lose, really. If
you're having me on, which you absolutely have to be,
then I'm going to be dead in a few weeks anyway and at
least I get to make love to a gorgeous female.'
<br>
<br>

`Thank you again for the compliment, ' beatrix said.
`Does that mean you agree? Only it's a bit more complex
than that.'
<br>
<br>

`It is? You mean we have to do it in some sort of different
way?' Tim suggested. `Or do we go over in the middle
of those daisies first?'
<br>
<br>

`No, we do it exactly the same way as humans, ' Beatrix
said. `Or so I'm told. You see, I never have before.
The urges don't come until this time of my cycle. Of
course, there are some of us who do it anyway, just for enjoyment,
but I could never see the point of it before. It just seemed
like a lot of huffing and puffing and perspiring bodies
everywhere.'
<br>
<br>

`Fairies sweat, then?'
<br>
<br>

`The correct term is perspire, ' Beatrix rebuked
him. `Sweating is a common thing.'
<br>
<br>

`So is sex, where I come from, ' Tim laughed. `But if
that's not it, what's so different, or so difficult?'
<br>
<br>

`Nothing as far as the mating is concerned, ' she replied,
coolly. She was already reaching behind her back, fumbling
with the zip on her dress. `But it's what happens to
you afterwards that is the thing. That's why we generally
only offer ourselves to someone who has nothing to lose
anyway.'
<br>
<br>

`Exactly!' Tim exclaimed. `And that's all that
interests me. Immortality or not, my sweet, I fancy you
like mad and if you want it half as badly as I do, then what
are we waiting for?'
<br>
<br>

`Oh, I do, ' Beatrix said, shrugging the thin material
from her shoulders, to reveal a perfectly formed pair of
breasts that simply disdained the need for any man-made
support. Tim sucked in his breath at the sight of her and
bent forward to untie the laces of his shoes ...
<br>
<br>

`The thing is, she was telling the truth about one thing,
'
Tim said. `She was most definitely a virgin.' Across
the table, Marcus Featherstone's face was wreathed
in smiles. Tim's tale was certainly outlandish, but
it had been told well and his oldest friend certainly looked
a lot healthier than he had in many a long month. Even his
hair had grown back and was glossy and sleek, if several
shades lighter than it had once been.
<br>
<br>

`I know the whole thing sounds crazy - Jeez, it is crazy,
'
Tim continued, `but there's no getting away from the
fact that I've gone into full remission. The quacks
are positive about that.'
<br>
<br>

`Have you tried finding out if you really are immortal?'
Marcus quipped.
<br>
<br>

`Short of jumping off a building, I don't see how I could,
'
Tim laughed. `Besides, she said that fairies could die,
they just had the facility to live forever if they were careful.
And, having been given the reprieve I've had, I don't
fancy any foolhardy experiments.'
<br>
<br>

`So, what happened to your fairy godmother afterwards?'
<br>
<br>

`Well, I don't know, ' Tim admitted, a trifle
sheepishly. `The sex was quite amazing. Whatever else
Beatrix might be, she was certainly one hell of a fuck. I
could have believed she'd been waiting five millenia,
the way she went. Trouble was, I was so knackered afterwards
that I just sort of ... well, dozed off.
<br>
<br>

`I wasn't asleep that long, but when I opened my eyes,
she was gone.'
<br>
<br>

`Back beyond her veil?'
<br>
<br>

`Who knows?' Tim shrugged. `But here's the spooky
bit. I sat up and ran my hand over my head - it's a habit
I've had since I was a kiddie - and guess what? I had stubble.
An hour or so earlier, I'd looked like a billiard ball
and yet now my hair had started to grow back. And another
thing, ' he continued.
<br>
<br>

`I found my way straight back to the main path without any
trouble, just as Beatrix predicted. Five minutes, that
was all it took and yet I'd been thrashing about for
an hour to get there.'
<br>
<br>

Marcus sat back and relit his cigar. `And just how long ago
was all this?' he asked. He did not believe a word of
it, but Tim evidently put some credence in it.
<br>
<br>

`Three weeks, ' Tim replied. `Twenty two days, to
be precise.'
<br>
<br>

`So, allowing for the time span since your previous x-ray,
your cancer cleared itself up in no more than five weeks.'
<br>
<br>

`Precisely! The doctors couldn't believe it when
they examined me yesterday. They reran every test in the
book to make sure.'
<br>
<br>

`And now you really believe this dotty bird might have been
a fairy?' Marcus grinned.
<br>
<br>

`I don't know what I believe, ' Tim retorted.
`But I do know one thing. On Saturday, I intend to try to find
that clearing again and see if she turns up.'
<br>
<br>

To his surprise, when Saturday came, Tim found the clearing
quite easily, as easily, in fact, as he had found his way
back from it three and a half weeks earlier. But, though
he sat and waited for nearly three hours, there was no sign
of Beatrix. A little crestfallen, he returned home.
<br>
<br>

The following Saturday, however, he could not resist the
urge to return for another chance of seeing the beautiful
blonde. However, it proved to be another fruitless vigil,
as did the following Saturday and the one after that. For
the next month or so, Tim made no further pilgrimages, but
then he did try again. The result was another blank.
<br>
<br>

About this time, though, he had another problem with which
to contend, for his nipples both suddenly became swollen
and quite sore. He tried a few proprietary ointments, but,
although the irritation quickly subsided, the nipples
did not. In fact, to his horror, he appeared to be developing
two small, but very definite breasts for them to perch on.
<br>
<br>

Thoroughly embarrassed, he put off visiting the doctor
with this affliction until the two mounds were unmistakable.
He needed a very loose fitting jumper to disguise his newly
aquired assets for the journey to the surgery. The doctor,
who had known Tim since his childhood, professed himself
quite perplexed.
<br>
<br>

`Ah don't know, laddie, ' he said, in his gruff
Glaswegian accent. `Ye'll need tae have some tests
at yon hospital. I'll have Gladys ring up and she'll
let ye know. Mind ye, it could be a while before they can fit
ye in. Yon's not a life threatening condition, at least,
nae that I can see.'
<br>
<br>

`But it is bloody embarrassing, doc, ' Tim complained.
The old man shrugged and coughed to clear his throat.
<br>
<br>

`Listen, y'wee beggar, ' he said, `a few weeks
ago y'were a-dying and now yer complaining about a
wee pair of girlie titties. Stop yer frettin' and get
on wi'life. We'll sort it all out in good time.
meanwhile, go see Nurse Fletcher and have her weigh you
and all the usual stuff. Yon hospital will be pesterin'
me for your regular checkup results from now on.'
<br>
<br>

The results of Nurse Fletcher's tests were also mildly
perturbing, for her records showed that Tim had lost nearly
two inches in height, though none of his trousers had appeared
too long, as he pointed out to the woman. She scrutinised
him carefully and then took out a cloth tape measure.
<br>
<br>

`It's gone from the waist up, mostly, ' she announced,
a few minutes or so later. `Curious, that is. You see, '
she explained, `women are generally longer in the leg in
comparison to men. And you seem to be putting on a bit of weight
around the hips, too.'
<br>
<br>

She measured him to confirm her suspicions. `I'll
tell doctor, ' she said, `and I think you ought to come
back in a fortnight, whether the hospital has been in touch,
or not.'
<br>
<br>

But long before a fortnight was up, Tim already knew what
was happening to him. He remembered now and only now, the
warning Beatrix had given him. Mating with her would not
only make him immortal, too, it would make him just like
her.
<br>
<br>

In every way
<br>
<br>

He sold the flat, withdrew his life savings and rented a
remote cottage, telling the estate agent that he was doing
so on behalf of a Miss Tania Bellamy. In the few days he had
before he was due to vacate the flat, he spent a lot of time
shopping in the next town, moving his purchases to his new
home under cover of darkness and finally moving in himself
in the early hours of a Friday morning.
<br>
<br>

A week later, anyone happening past The Laurels would have
seen a pretty young woman, dressed in slacks and a white
cotton blouse, her blonde hair tied back in a ponytail,
busily - indeed angrily - pulling daisies from the front
lawn. However, few people ever did pass the cottage, which
was near the end of a lane that had once led to a now abandoned
abbatoir and so Miss Tania Bellamy, who had once been Tim
Gideon, worked on undisturbed.
<br>
<br>

Undisturbed, that is, except by the final changes that
were happening to his body beneath his feminine clothes.
His breasts were now well formed and generous, yet they
stood without support in exactly the same way as had Beatrix's.
He had grown shorter still, though his legs were very long,
even longer in proportion than when the nurse had last measured
him.
<br>
<br>

There was also very little left of his manhood, which had
been shrinking at an alarming rate, whilst, in its place,
was quickly developing an unmistakable female vagina.
With his widening hips and rounded buttocks, Tim knew that
he could hardly even think of himself as a man anymore and,
when he looked into the mirror, the sad face that stared
out at him had wide lips, high cheekbones and a pert nose,
at either side of which were two huge almond shaped eyes,
the pupils of which were steadily growing greener ...
<br>
<br>

It was late spring when Tania Bellamy parked her car in the
gravelled area at the edge of the woods. She slipped off
her stiletto heeled shoes and replaced them with a more
sensible pair of flat heeled sandals, picked up her handbag
and set off along the main path.
<br>
<br>

The clearing looked exactly the same as it had done when
Tim had first found it almost exactly one year earlier.
The daisies gleamed whitely against their green carpet
and the sun shone almost overhead. Laurie moved to the edge
of the circle of little flowers, sat down and waited.
<br>
<br>

The figure appeared from out of thin air, standing on the
darker mauve patch where Tim had first seen Beatrix twelve
months earlier, but this time it was not her, but a young
man, equally as fair, equally as striking in appearance
and he was carrying a small bundle.
<br>
<br>

`Hello, Tania, ' he said, his musical voice as light
in the air as had been his female predecessor's. `I've
brought someone to see you. No, don't stand up.'
The young man squatted down beside Tania and pulled back
the shawl. The tiny little face, with its deep green and
gold eyes, peered up at her.
<br>
<br>

`Meet your daughter, ' the young man said. `Her name
is Venetia. I stayed in Venice once and it was really lovely.
I hope you approve of the name.'
<br>
<br>

`Very nice, ' Tania/Tim replied, slowly. `But who
are you? Are you Beatrix's fairy husband, or what?'
The young man laughed and shook his head.
<br>
<br>

`No. My name is Blaine now, but it wasn't always so.'
Tania peered into his face, searching deep in those emerald
eyes, whose colour her own now mirrored.
<br>
<br>

`It's you!' she breathed. `You're Beatrix
- or you were, a year ago!' The young man nodded.
<br>
<br>

`Yes, I was, ' he admitted. `And, after Venetia was
born, I began changing as you did, for my mating and our daughter's
birth has moved me into the second cycle of my being, as will
one day happen to you.'
<br>
<br>

`One day?' Tania echoed. `You mean like in about five
thousand years?' Blaine nodded.
<br>
<br>

`About that, yes, ' he agreed.
<br>
<br>

`And in the meantime?'
<br>
<br>

`Well, apart from raising our son, we fairies still have
a lot of responsibilities, even in these heathen times.'
<br>
<br>

`And what about me - us, I mean? Am I expected - ?'
<br>
<br>

`You are my wife now and that is the law. In our world, there
is no divorce.' Tania jumped to her feet, her hands
flying to her mouth in horror.
<br>
<br>

`You mean I'm expected to - ?' Blaine cut her short
with a tinkling laugh and stood up, still carefully cradling
his precious bundle.
<br>
<br>

`Don't worry, my darling Tania, ' he said, holding
out his free hand for hers. `Remember, I once told you, we
don't very often get the urge, except when mating time
comes around. Mind you, I am intrigued to find out how this
new body performs in certain respects. Maybe, given time,
you will feel the same.'
<br>
<br>

They linked hands. Blaine nodded towards the central circle.
<br>
<br>

`Shall we go?' he suggested. Tania made to pull back,
but his grip was strong.
<br>
<br>

`Where to?' she asked, her voice little more than a
croak. Blaine smiled.
<br>
<br>

`Well, as we seem to have completed another link in the daisy
chain of our eternal existance, ' he said, `I suggest
we go home.'
The End

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If this is not your own work, you can't post it. Copyright
infringement.

7/19/2005

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I guess she can

11/27/2005