A woodchuck question  

jasonmisty85 37M
13 posts
9/26/2005 5:54 am

Last Read:
3/5/2006 9:27 pm

A woodchuck question

If a woodchuck A chucked wood at 3 trees per year but had to compete with woodchuck B every third year for one tree a year (in which he consistently lost); could woodchuck A deforest a grove of 20 trees in a 10 year span?


UvannaHumpalot 38F

9/30/2005 8:27 pm

no...
a woodchuck's lifespan is only 7 years


UvannaHumpalot 38F

9/30/2005 8:34 pm

now my question...
if a sample of natural salt is stored in an air tight clear container, maintained at a temperature of 68F, with absolutely no signs of breakdown or moisture.....why is it the salt sample was destroyed when attempting lyophilization???


jasonmisty85 37M
7 posts
10/1/2005 8:47 am

Due to the nature of the questions I’ll make a few assumptions.

1) The salt has no contaminates.
2) The system is closed i.e. no mass transfer, but not necessarily isolated. Because I’m assuming it’s a closed system the vacuum applied to the sample is before the initial recording time for the experiment.

On to the nature of “destroying the salt”; postulating under the two given assumptions, I suspect the salt simply evaporated filling the volume of the container. The lower pressure due to vacuum and the specified temperature allowed for sublimation of the salt. The salt was in the regime of a phase diagram in which it could go from solid to gas.

Without looking up any thermodynamic data, I would guess that the pressure would have to be extremely high. I can’t recall of any salts undergoing sublimation at moderately low pressure.

If my answer is correct then the salt is not destroyed it just simply exists in a different phase.

Also, one would have to worry as to how much salt is in the given container, typically there will exist a visually observable equilibrium between the two phases (solid and gas) which dependent on amount of salt.


jasonmisty85 37M
7 posts
10/1/2005 8:48 am

Due to the nature of the questions I’ll make a few assumptions.

1) The salt has no contaminates.
2) The system is closed i.e. no mass transfer, but not necessarily isolated. Because I’m assuming it’s a closed system the vacuum applied to the sample is before the initial recording time for the experiment.

On to the nature of “destroying the salt”; postulating under the two given assumptions, I suspect the salt simply evaporated filling the volume of the container. The lower pressure due to vacuum and the specified temperature allowed for sublimation of the salt. The salt was in the regime of a phase diagram in which it could go from solid to gas.

Without looking up any thermodynamic data, I would guess that the pressure would have to be extremely high. I can’t recall of any salts undergoing sublimation at moderately low pressure.

If my answer is correct then the salt is not destroyed it just simply exists in a different phase.

Also, one would have to worry as to how much salt is in the given container, typically there will exist a visually observable equilibrium between the two phases (solid and gas) which is dependent on the amount of salt.


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