Politicizing Victimization  

intierzha 45M
311 posts
8/15/2006 8:30 pm

Last Read:
1/10/2007 3:07 pm

Politicizing Victimization


These days, perception is everything, and if you can make yourself appear to be a victim, no matter how good or bad you are, then you have an edge. Of course, I speak of the recent crisis in Israel and Lebanon, but I could speak of many events, going back to the first televised crisis, the Vietnam conflict, a war not officially a war. Indeed, no conflict the United States has participated in since World War II has been officially a war. Yet, the media gives conflicts names and they stick. The Iraq conflict, which has been over since 2003, is still called a war, when it should be called an occupation, for that is what it is. Anyone before the television era would call it that. Historically, that is what our presence in Iraq is. Semantics, alas, is in the eye of the propagator. I should point out I am not praising or denigrating the causes and outcomes of these conflicts, just their perception and usage in the public eye. And unfortunately, it has drawn me slightly off topic (which can almost guarantee I'm not using anyone else's words here). So, back to this issue of victimization that is tied into perception and semantics.

Of course, victims need imagery. The United States has benefited from imagery. I really need no further example than 'December 7, 1941, a date which will live in infamy'. FDR's words defined the quintessential victim response(in this case warranted, at least that is the general, and my view) and created imagery that united the country in moving toward war with Japan and Germany. Later, we have used other images to propel us into crisis and conflict, the most recent of course being the fall of the World Trade Center on 9/11. To me, these are examples of victimization being justified to an extent, though I am sure many would disagree with my latter example as opposed to the former. Again, not debating right or wrong, just how these words and images affect us.

Now, as information comes at us with such alacrity it would please the Flash, it is harder to judge the images as most people are simply overwhelmed by the imagery. How many websites and newspaper sites plus cable stations covered the current crisis in Israel and Lebanon (and by association Iran and Syria)? Amazing, really how quickly one could access this information and how quickly victims were created before we had even time to think about the crisis. This was especially true in the partisan news outlets and websites (not surprisingly). Hezbollah appeared the victim before the first shot was fired, regardless of whether Israel was justified or not. Personally, I felt Israel was and that Hezbollah used the victim card so much it ultimately allowed them to feel that they 'triumphed'. Indeed, the conflict amounted to little more than a standoff with too many casualties on both sides, but the perception that is being fed to the world at large is a victory for Hezbollah. If by victory they mean continuing to hold a country hostage through tacit approval by their masters in Iran and Syria, then ok, a victory. I am sure I am over simplifying things, and politicization is a tough issue, as is being victimized. On the other hand, I wish we could see things as they are, not what we are led to perceive.

The sad thing about this, and all such conflicts, is that the dead are still dead. And yes, fellow humans dying for what they 'believe' in is never a simple thing either. I just wish they'd stop believing and start thinking. Anyway, I hope I have been somewhat clearer than mud, and suppose I have not much more to say on the issue.

Everyone take care out there.

C.

LilSquirt_4mfm 68M/68F
3394 posts
8/15/2006 9:07 pm

hi intier ... good post here

my take is that it's not "what they believe in" here ...... it's one bent on destuction of the other to start their own blessed Armageddon happening wherin they will be happy ever after ... and for the other, it basic raw survival as an entity.

LilJessicaSQuirt
My ♥§ΩuirT♥er & MFM Blog


BaronessK 53F

8/16/2006 1:39 am

One day, dear, we should talk politics together...but I feel I know so little compared to those on here that do talk it so I rarely comment and never post it on my own blog. I did want to tell you that I believe you make so many valid points.


intierzha 45M

8/16/2006 11:54 am

    Quoting LilSquirt_4mfm:
    hi intier ... good post here

    my take is that it's not "what they believe in" here ...... it's one bent on destuction of the other to start their own blessed Armageddon happening wherin they will be happy ever after ... and for the other, it basic raw survival as an entity.

    Lil♥Jessica♥SQuirt
    My ♥§ΩuirT♥er & MFM Blog
Thanks for stopping by and I do agree on the Armageddon issue... it seems that destruction for the sake of destruction (the essence of Armageddon to me) is the problem. They talk of survival for the sake of rhetoric, but it is hard to listen anymore, and I try to be sympathetic. Yet I find I cannot be as much as I used to.

btw, Armageddon, the Greek for the Hebrew Megiddo,(or hill of Megiddo, which is more literal) is more a Christian tradition than anything else. I am not as versed in Islamic Apocalyptic tradition(except for their definitions of paradise), but Judaism really has no Apocalypse, though Gehenna has been misinterpreted as well. Gehenna was a place of human sacrifice in pre-Exilic times that the Israelites and Judahites feared.

Thanks again for the comments,
C.


intierzha 45M

8/16/2006 12:10 pm

    Quoting BaronessK:
    One day, dear, we should talk politics together...but I feel I know so little compared to those on here that do talk it so I rarely comment and never post it on my own blog. I did want to tell you that I believe you make so many valid points.
Ack, lost my post... darn it. It boiled down to the fact I have my sympathies, but it is important to me to remain objective when having a discussion and interpret the data in that fashion. Regardless of sympathies, it is clear to me that the cycle of violence is going to end, one way or the other. Alas, it will be the end no one wants, but everyone can see.

C.


akron42   
2375 posts
8/16/2006 5:52 pm

I love the post! I agree that the victimization gives us a false perception in many instances. Hezbollah has certainly used that "card" and pushed it to the limit. I have to put some blame on the Lebanese also for allowing Hezbollah to maintain its position by use of their country. I know many will say that the Lebanese were fooled by Hezbollah, that they were unaware of their true intent, but I disagree. They thought it would give them a position of power which is just another form of greed. I may have mentioned this before, but it bears repeating. Every Lebanese I have ever known, man or woman, has IDOLIZED Hitler. They don't care who he hurt (as long as it wasn't them!) or by what means he got it, but they were in awe of the power he weilded. It's a dangerous game they're playing and I, for one, hope they lose. As always, loved reading your post!


intierzha 45M

8/16/2006 6:58 pm

I have to say, I don't know that many Lebanese, but the attitudes of their government and those who run Hezbollah show they will do anything, hurt anyone to foster their message of hate. Power games are always dangerous regardless of the initiator, but this one is pretty rough. I don't think they want to push Israel again. They might decide to stop listening to the League of Nations...er, I mean the UN. (sorry, little history joke. The UN is dangerously becoming their inept predecessor, the League).

Anyway, thanks for stopping by and reading, appreciate the comments.

C.


Become a member to create a blog