Men called Nick need not apply...  

helga_hansen 50F  
3122 posts
1/22/2006 11:19 pm

Last Read:
3/5/2006 9:27 pm

Men called Nick need not apply...

Are all the men in England called Nick??? When wading through my inbox, it certainly seems that way!

Don't get me wrong, there is nothing wrong being called Nick. I like the name Nick. I have happy and fond memories of a man called Nick. And that's just it. I have those memories, and I don't want to have to start thinking of them in terms of Nick So-and-So versus Nick Somebody Else.

Happy Memories Nick was and still is a great guy. Of course I'd love to still be in his world, but he has swum off and found other fish to fry, and I'm cool with that. At least I still have his friendship, and how many of us can confess to remaining friends with past lovers?

The current would-be Nick is named for the drummer in Pink Floyd. Mr Hansen would be tickled pink if he were indeed said drummer, but I know that this Nick isn't. His skills lie somewhere else (or so he'd have me believe). This Nick has been relentless in his pursuit of me, but there is something about him that has me operating under the heading
CAUTION: APPROACH WITH CARE.

I can't explain my reasons for thinking in that way. In truth, I'd much rather be pursued by someone else... as long as his name wasn't Nick!!


PS. Does anyone know how the term nickname came about?


Love, hugs and kisses from ♥♥HH♥♥


Efilnikufecin69 48M

1/22/2006 11:46 pm

A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or thing's real name (for example, Tom is short for Thomas). As a concept, it is distinct from both pseudonym and stage name, although there may be overlap in these concepts. A nickname is sometimes considered desirable, symbolising a form of acceptance, but can often be a form of ridicule. Many artists and actors have nicknames, which in years past were called a stage name. A person's online nickname may also be known as his handle, especially within hacker culture.

Etymology: In Middle English the word was ekename (from the verb to eke, "enlarge"; compare Swedish öknamn). Later, an ekename developed into a nickname when the "n" shifted through junctural metanalysis.

In Viking societies, many people had nicknames heiti, viðrnefni or uppnefi which were used in addition to, or instead of their family names. In some circumstances the giving of a nickname had a special status in Viking society in that it created a relationship between the name maker and the recipient of the nickname, to the extent that the creation of a nickname also often entailed a formal ceremony and an exchange of gifts.


NickRules999 40M
9464 posts
1/23/2006 12:29 am

Hey. My name is Nick. LOL

Don't worry, I'm not pursuing you. I could not help but notice the title, so I had to take a look.

Come into my realm! You aren't afraid...are you?


keithcancook 61M
18125 posts
1/23/2006 12:38 am

I know a nick who's a knucklehead. He nicked his neck on his knee in his knickers, which gave me the snickers. For a nickel I'll nix knocking nicks in here.


starlight_runner 40F

1/23/2006 12:49 am

if u ask me go with your instinct.I have noticed this too and a lot of mats.Debs seems very frequent too.I feel a survey is in order what do u think.

huggles star


Babel__Fish 46F

1/23/2006 12:55 am

    Quoting Efilnikufecin69:
    A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or thing's real name (for example, Tom is short for Thomas). As a concept, it is distinct from both pseudonym and stage name, although there may be overlap in these concepts. A nickname is sometimes considered desirable, symbolising a form of acceptance, but can often be a form of ridicule. Many artists and actors have nicknames, which in years past were called a stage name. A person's online nickname may also be known as his handle, especially within hacker culture.

    Etymology: In Middle English the word was ekename (from the verb to eke, "enlarge"; compare Swedish öknamn). Later, an ekename developed into a nickname when the "n" shifted through junctural metanalysis.

    In Viking societies, many people had nicknames heiti, viðrnefni or uppnefi which were used in addition to, or instead of their family names. In some circumstances the giving of a nickname had a special status in Viking society in that it created a relationship between the name maker and the recipient of the nickname, to the extent that the creation of a nickname also often entailed a formal ceremony and an exchange of gifts.


Ya what he said!

I was just about to post the very same thing. (j/k)


digdug41 50M

1/23/2006 1:20 am

hey maybe a stephen will come along ya never know lol cya later

roaming the cyber streets of blogland


TheQuietGuy2005 56M
2386 posts
1/23/2006 10:28 am

The Nick in my life isn't likely to be pursuing you any time soon ... how do you feel about Jeffs?


JJKittyKat 60F

1/23/2006 2:53 pm

fish?


helga_hansen 50F  
1987 posts
1/23/2006 3:12 pm

Efil... wow! Thanks... very informative... and interesting!

Nick... no worries. Lol. And welcome to my blog!

Keith... thanks

Star... let me know when you want to run that survey!

Babel... he did say it well, didn't he?

Dig... mmm... perhaps he will!

Q... Jeff? Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm... it does have a certain appeal!

JJ... the man has a taste for anchovies... they're fish, aren't they?

Love, hugs and kisses from ♥♥HH♥♥


TheQuietGuy2005 56M
2386 posts
1/23/2006 3:26 pm

{Homer Simpson voice}mmmmmmmm an-cho-veees ...


rm_Nicknackwack 59M
12 posts
1/27/2006 4:31 pm

<<<< Old Nick a.k.a. The Devil !


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