Fat is a feminist issue  

annierocks 62F
164 posts
7/13/2006 4:21 pm

Last Read:
7/27/2006 3:39 pm

Fat is a feminist issue


is the title of book published decades ago. One of the main theses was that women are under tremendous societal pressure to be very thin in an attempt to reduce their power. Women, having the ability to grow life and give birth are/can be intimidating. In an attempt (by other women as well as men?) to ameliorate this power, women are pressured to stay small, to take up less space, to be less "there."

There is a certain amount of face validity to this. Thoughts?

fantasia_shares 48M/45F
4164 posts
7/13/2006 5:01 pm

Ummmm...I think this sounds like a dumb idea.

I think it goes more like this...men are visual creatures. They appreciate a fine, curvy body, but lumps and bumps aren't so much their thing. A significant number of them are egotistical enough to think that women should conform to their ideal, rather than focus on the things that are important to themselves.

That's pretty much it, in a nutshell.

Fantasia

You might want to know who to watch out for around here: Are YOU a Dirty Bad Man or Woman !

Please tell me the secrets of your sex appeal Primping!

And a MUST READ: [post 2294897]

Just shamelessly pimping my own damned blog!
{=}


annierocks 62F

7/13/2006 5:07 pm

I'll buy that...but what shaped the ideal?


puntachueca 107M

7/13/2006 5:15 pm

The magnitude of efforts to diminish the power of the Goddess are endless. Too fat...then too thin..then too smart....gotta have this hairstyle, gotta wear that fashion...gotta please please please to survive.


annierocks 62F

7/13/2006 5:24 pm

PUntachueca, sounds like you agree?


49AK 56M
1823 posts
7/13/2006 6:08 pm

Well... I have a slightly different take on it, but the result is the same.

The cultural ideal for women is defined by men. It isn't like there's a committee, and they meet and create a standard by which all women are measured. Instead, we are bombarded with images and roles which are filled with women, and those images and roles are intended to resonate in some way with us as a positive and non-threatening symbol of what being a woman means. Because these images and roles are created mostly for commercial application, the driving force for the definition of these symbols is by definition male-centered.

While it is true that women occupy an ever-increasing role in our business world, the majority of the women that succeed in the business world are the ones that adopt a male-centered world view. Otherwise, they have a world view that is in conflict with their environment, and find advancement difficult.

As an example, imagine a person that is confident, aggressive and gregarious. If that person is male, he is a leader, and if that person is female, she's pushy. Successful women don't have the same traits as men, because men define what women should look and behave like in their world... being thin is just one of those criteria.


rm_mk1867 59M
60 posts
7/13/2006 6:13 pm

TV, movies and the American way perpetuates this silly idea. Just watch commercials on TV. The fat guy is always the loser the skinny guy is always the winner. Watch some you'll see what I mean.


annierocks 62F

7/13/2006 6:17 pm

YOu are right mk...it is still acceptable to discriminate openly against he obese.

AK? I think i'm in love..and you are soooooooooo far away. Alas.


WestSideAl2004 72M

7/15/2006 5:55 am

I don't agree with the book. Nature teaches many animals to shrink and hide when pursued. Blend in. Be small. H'mmm... I wonder.

Women's desire to be thin is a direct response to the marketing efforts of the fashion industry. Designers don't do well accepting the challenge of dressing a plus size woman attractively.

The ability to give birth commands respect. It does not intimidate. Women can't do it alone (yet), so we attract each other with our respective capabilities, not intimidate.

Some random thoughts: Posture rules! Health reigns! Annie rocks! And variety is the spice of life!

What would Michaelangelo think?

Al


annierocks 62F

7/15/2006 6:03 am

Interesting points, Al. But as to animals -- humans are not instinct-driven as are "lower order" animals. For example, human females don't go into estrus, etc.

Designers certainly do perpetuate the thin requirement. Bt where did that standard come from?


WestSideAl2004 72M

7/15/2006 6:50 am

New York, of course!
I don't think the standard was around in other countries before the "svelt" look of the thirties and forties was popularized.


fantasia_shares 48M/45F
4164 posts
7/26/2006 7:17 pm

Standard? There are different standards for different industries. Women who make their mark, however, differentiate. My hubby and many males I know prefer an hourglass shaped woman. Big hips, large breasts...infer an ability to get freaky and procreate.

As far as what is fashionable, I don't think that is male-driven. It has something to do with fashion, ease of design, or some such stuff. Victoria Secret's models are curvy. Queen Latifa is gorgeous and quite overweight. She falls into the category of someone who has differentiated. Healthwise, it is best to maintain a certain fat/weight range. Some people just have eating disorders (Ms. Nicole Richie). Many men prefer a nice lean woman because she looks healthy...physically fit, strong. Look at the people who really stand out these days...swimsuit models and the like. These women have stomaches of steel, amazing form, muscular and lean. Being fat simply isn't very healthy. Being overweight is a genetic problem, i.e. if your mom is particularly obese, your chances of being that way too, even with healthy eating habits, are high.

Nope, I completely disagree with the theoretical viewpoints presented as you've layed them out here. Of course, I haven't read the book, either

Fantasia

You might want to know who to watch out for around here: Are YOU a Dirty Bad Man or Woman !

Please tell me the secrets of your sex appeal Primping!

And a MUST READ: [post 2294897]

Just shamelessly pimping my own damned blog!
{=}


annierocks 62F

7/26/2006 7:45 pm

If you do, would be interested in your analysis. I was skeptical when I first read it, but the logic grew on me. Problem is, how can you test such a thesis? It winds up being opinion with out experimental evidence.


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