Night Terrors and Granpa Munster  

Kaliedascope61 43M
3157 posts
2/4/2006 11:29 pm

Last Read:
3/26/2006 4:44 am

Night Terrors and Granpa Munster

Grandpa Munster dies at age 82

Just a few hours ago I was saddened to hear that grandpa Munster has passed on. Another Munster has gone into the unknown and all we are left with is little Eddie Munster. Al Lewis, the cigar-chomping patriarch of "The Munsters" whose work as a basketball scout, restaurateur and political candidate never eclipsed his role as Grandpa from the television sitcom, died after years of failing health. He was 82. I remember as a kid, sneaking out of my room late at night and watching the re runs on ABC, even then I was fascinated by all things black & white, Al Lewis and Fred Gwynne were to of my favorites. Did you know that he ran for Governor of New York? He got over 52,000 votes and went to court over the right to have his name appear on the ballad as Grandpa Al Lewis. He led a very interesting life, and he is someone I highly recommend you go and read about, just for the entertainment value.

Have you ever had a Night Terror? If so then you know what I’m talking about and you should skip to the dream, but first I feel like I need to put a little definition here so that other’s will understand these types of dreams.

Night Terror ‒ A dream from which is difficult to awake from, often causes temporally paralysis, sudden movements, and yelling. Think of it as a Nightmare X’s a hundred.

I had one this afternoon, I get them quite often actually. Mine usually are repeating ones, with just little variations but this one was different. If you have never heard of the old hag, then you should Google it and get some back ground on it, and the dream will make a little sense to you.

The Dream
I fell asleep gently and slowly and woke up with a great pressure on my chest, with a feeling like I was being pinned down by a strong force, I was at a stage where I thought I was awake but could not move, after having dreams like this so often I knew I was still sleeping and tried to force myself to wake up.
I looked over and saw my alarm clock and its bright red numbers 5:34, My eyes are open, I must be awake, in a haze I forced myself off my bed, it seemed I weighed a ton, I managed to get to the bathroom to turn a light on, and I realized I’m still in the dream! I turned my head again, my eyes open and looked at the alarm clock 5:35, same thing happened, heavy feeling, get to the light in the bathroom…again the clock…5:36, this repeated what seemed like 5 or 6 times before I finally rolled right out of my bed onto the floor, which in fact woke me up, with a loud thud and a sore elbow!

What triggers these things? Who knows, from what I read it’s mostly caused by stress, but you can blame anything on stress.

Something for my friends in the comments.


Kaliedascope61 43M
4084 posts
2/5/2006 12:23 am

I only wanted real people who auctaly view comments or are planning to make a comment to see this.

This is a song I wrote.

Turning Pages

So much longer then I wanted
things expected I cannot accept
Endless it seems as time consumes me
and I'm not to proud to leave

I'm only watching the time
escaping, only to find myself hiding
wrapped in warmth that leaves me cold
shivering in the deep end

Turning pages
endless changes
photograph the memory
because I might forget
I might lose track
and all this time
might slip by me

Sitting here I am waiting
for the right words to appear
Its lonely, and I'm lost down here
nothing is wrong, nothing is wrong

The burning inside will consume me
we only imagined what was created
In a short life, for the meanwhile
I'll be in my chair, waiting for a smile

(c) 2003


angelgrrl 49F

2/5/2006 12:07 pm

Night terrors are the worst thing -- the subject doesn't matter so much, but it's the sheer emotion, just fear in its purest form, and it's so hard to shake.

I like your song. A lot. I always wished I had the gift for lyrics and poetry. It's fairly easy to espress a thought in a paragraph, much more difficult in a couple of words.


Kaliedascope61 43M
4084 posts
2/5/2006 7:05 pm

angelgrrl - Thank you for your sweet words, I enjoyed reading your blog this morning.


Kaliedascope61 43M
4084 posts
2/6/2006 1:15 pm

My worst experience was one night while sleeping near my window, I opened my eyes and I felt like something was trying to pull me out of that window. I don't get them that often, a couple of times a year at most. when I do, I've always been alone in bed. I think Dr. Phil might be right. But I have watched enough x files to think what if....

Yes I do play guitar, not very well, just enough to string chords together for a demo. I have a friend that takes my songs and arranges and records them.


absolutelynormal 57F
6563 posts
3/15/2006 12:07 am

What is Narcolepsy?

Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological disorder caused by the brain's inability to regulate sleep-wake cycles normally. At various times throughout the day, people with narcolepsy experience fleeting urges to sleep. If the urge becomes overwhelming, individuals will fall asleep for periods lasting from a few seconds to several minutes. In rare cases, some people may remain asleep for an hour or longer. In addition to excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), three other major symptoms frequently characterize narcolepsy: cataplexy, or the sudden loss of voluntary muscle tone; vivid hallucinations during sleep onset or upon awakening; and brief episodes of total paralysis at the beginning or end of sleep. Narcolepsy is not definitively diagnosed in most patients until 10 to 15 years after the first symptoms appear. The cause of narcolepsy remains unknown. It is likely that narcolepsy involves multiple factors interacting to cause neurological dysfunction and sleep disturbances.

Is there any treatment?

There is no cure for narcolepsy. In 1999, after successful clinical trial results, the FDA approved a drug called modafinil for the treatment of EDS. Two classes of antidepressant drugs have proved effective in controlling cataplexy in many patients: tricyclics (including imipramine, desipramine, clomipramine, and protriptyline) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (including fluoxetine and sertraline). drug therapy should be supplemented by behavioral strategies. For example, many people with narcolepsy take short, regularly scheduled naps at times when they tend to feel sleepiest. Improving the quality of nighttime sleep can combat EDS and help relieve persistent feelings of fatigue. Among the most important common-sense measures people with narcolepsy can take to enhance sleep quality are actions such as maintaining a regular sleep schedule, and avoiding alcohol and caffeine-containing beverages before bedtime.

What is the prognosis?

None of the currently available medications enables people with narcolepsy to consistently maintain a fully normal state of alertness. But EDS and cataplexy, the most disabling symptoms of the disorder, can be controlled in most patients with drug treatment. Often the treatment regimen is modified as symptoms change. Whatever the age of onset, patients find that the symptoms tend to get worse over the two to three decades after the first symptoms appear. Many older patients find that some daytime symptoms decrease in severity after age 60.

What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research into narcolepsy and other sleep disorders in laboratories at the NIH and also support additional research through grants to major medical institutions across the country. The NINDS continues to support investigations into the basic biology of sleep, including the brain mechanisms involved in generating and regulating sleep. Within the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, also a component of the NIH, the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) coordinates Federal government sleep research activities and shares information with private and nonprofit groups.

Select this link to view a list of studies currently seeking patients.


Kaliedascope61 43M
4084 posts
3/15/2006 9:24 am

    Quoting absolutelynormal:
    What is Narcolepsy?

    Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological disorder caused by the brain's inability to regulate sleep-wake cycles normally. At various times throughout the day, people with narcolepsy experience fleeting urges to sleep. If the urge becomes overwhelming, individuals will fall asleep for periods lasting from a few seconds to several minutes. In rare cases, some people may remain asleep for an hour or longer. In addition to excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), three other major symptoms frequently characterize narcolepsy: cataplexy, or the sudden loss of voluntary muscle tone; vivid hallucinations during sleep onset or upon awakening; and brief episodes of total paralysis at the beginning or end of sleep. Narcolepsy is not definitively diagnosed in most patients until 10 to 15 years after the first symptoms appear. The cause of narcolepsy remains unknown. It is likely that narcolepsy involves multiple factors interacting to cause neurological dysfunction and sleep disturbances.

    Is there any treatment?

    There is no cure for narcolepsy. In 1999, after successful clinical trial results, the FDA approved a drug called modafinil for the treatment of EDS. Two classes of antidepressant drugs have proved effective in controlling cataplexy in many patients: tricyclics (including imipramine, desipramine, clomipramine, and protriptyline) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (including fluoxetine and sertraline). drug therapy should be supplemented by behavioral strategies. For example, many people with narcolepsy take short, regularly scheduled naps at times when they tend to feel sleepiest. Improving the quality of nighttime sleep can combat EDS and help relieve persistent feelings of fatigue. Among the most important common-sense measures people with narcolepsy can take to enhance sleep quality are actions such as maintaining a regular sleep schedule, and avoiding alcohol and caffeine-containing beverages before bedtime.

    What is the prognosis?

    None of the currently available medications enables people with narcolepsy to consistently maintain a fully normal state of alertness. But EDS and cataplexy, the most disabling symptoms of the disorder, can be controlled in most patients with drug treatment. Often the treatment regimen is modified as symptoms change. Whatever the age of onset, patients find that the symptoms tend to get worse over the two to three decades after the first symptoms appear. Many older patients find that some daytime symptoms decrease in severity after age 60.

    What research is being done?

    The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research into narcolepsy and other sleep disorders in laboratories at the NIH and also support additional research through grants to major medical institutions across the country. The NINDS continues to support investigations into the basic biology of sleep, including the brain mechanisms involved in generating and regulating sleep. Within the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, also a component of the NIH, the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) coordinates Federal government sleep research activities and shares information with private and nonprofit groups.

    Select this link to view a list of studies currently seeking patients.
I don't think i have narcolopsy....but that is very interesting reading.


absolutelynormal 57F
6563 posts
3/16/2006 9:49 am

A friend of my son's has it. That's the only reason I know of the variable responses to it. When I think of narcolepsy I think of people who fall asleep at the wheel or while they are talking to you. There is a film about it that I saw years ago. Some university has dachsunds that they breed who have narcolepsy. It's funny but not funny, they would show they poor pups a dog treat. They would get really excited and then just fall over asleep. They would be standing on their hind legs and just fall over, it had something to do with them getting excited and it sounds like there was a great deal of excitement in your dream. I'm not saying you have it, just pointing out similarities. : ) Mac


rm_metalmama69 43F
3878 posts
3/24/2006 8:56 pm

Thank you for the link to your post on my blog!

I don't think some people can understand how totally horrible night terrors can be until they've had one themselves. I've had them for years, and after getting them I usually cant sleep for a few nights. I've discovered that for me, it seems to make a difference in the frequency and severity of the dreams how safe I feel in my life.
As a teenager I was taught a technique of pulling someone into my dream. It only works if I trust that person with my life. I have 3 people I can pull in, two are deceased and one would lay down his life for me without question.
I was also taught to use a safe number.....a number that you call out in your dream to make your sub-consious aware that you are dreaming. This is not real effective for me, however.
When I have one, I whimper, cry, shake and tremble. When I have a real bad one I cry alot, scream bloody murder, curl into a fetal position, or end up in the corner or closet terrified. (Last night it was the closet, I bruised my forehead in the process ) Sometimes my eyes are open, I could be looking right at you or speaking to you but I'm always sleeping very deeply and completely unaware. It is not easy to wake me up from one and I have never became violent, so I'm told.
They can be very intimidating and make you not want to go to sleep. Like now.


Kaliedascope61 replies on 3/25/2006 8:06 am:
I had one and my lover heard it over the phone the other night, I can't remember exactly what happened, usually when something changes in it I wake up and can't remember

My are usually the same thing, and then gradually change over the years.

I dont have a safe place, I'm totally paralyzed, unable to think in a normal way, I cannot pull anyone in, most of the time I think I am awake and paralyzed, or running or fighting something.


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