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For Better or Worse   by Greta Christina

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Reviewer Greta Christina has worked in and around the sex industry for over a decade writing about it, editing books about it, and living it. She edited Paying For It, a collection of articles by all kinds of sex workers: dommes, escorts, peep show girls, T-girls. She's got a novella called Bending coming out this July in Susie Bright's book Three Kinds of Asking For It (published by Simon & Schuster). In response to overwhelming member requests for reviews of sex toys, sexy films, and other sex whatnots, Ms. Christina brings her girl-about-sex wisdom twice monthly to Adult FriendFinder. You can check out Ms. Christina on her web site, www.GretaChristina.com. Or write your comments to her on the site. Her handle is Sextoyreviewer.


Taboo: Forbidden Fantasies for Couples, Cleis Press $14.95


edited by Violet Blue
(Violet Blue)
---
[Here's what Greta has to say:]
I realize that calling an erotica anthology uneven is like calling the ocean wet. It's practically built into the definition of the thing. When you have a couple dozen or more stories by a couple dozen or more writers, you're going to have ups and downs, higher points and less high points. And in an erotica collection, you're naturally going to have stories that turn you on and ones that don't, stories that cater to your favorite delectable desires and stories that cater to other people's weird-ass kinks (or their totally boring ones).

But while all erotica anthologies are uneven, some are more uneven than others. Some range from damn good to fucking great; others wobble about in the mediocre range. And some, like Taboo, are all over the damn map, with stories that send you flying... and stories that make you wonder why (or even if) the writer cared.

Taboo was put together by the editor of the Sweet Life anthologies [see our "Sexpert" archives for an interview with Taboo editor Violet Blue], and it's in a similar vein: stories about (and for) committed, long-term, heterosexual couples acting out fantasies and exploring new sexual possibilities, aimed at a couples audience and meant to both arouse and inspire. But Taboo has an important twist. While the fantasies in the Sweet Life books are on the gentle, not-very-threatening side -- first-time spankings, three-ways, dildos, and the like -- the stories in Taboo are kinkier, edgier, more extreme. Taboo has public sex, public kink, medical scenes, scenes, gender-fuck, sex with strangers, sex with guns, and heaps upon heaps of heavy-duty hard-core dominance, submission, and sadomasochism. It's all about couples consensually exploring fantasies together -- but there's a huge variety in the fantasies and fetishes that the couples in the stories are exploring.

And there's a huge variety in the quality of those stories. Taboo is so interestingly uneven that you could almost use it in a writing class, an object lesson in what makes porn fiction work -- and what doesn't.



Lesson 1: You can't write a good porn story by just describing a series of physical events. Really effective porn gets inside the characters' heads and bodies, makes the reader feel what they're feeling. "After Hours" by Dante Davidson does this exquisitely. One of the better and more twisted stories in Taboo, it describes a medical scene between a doctor and a nurse, a gynecological exam with a sexual edge that gradually crosses the line from nasty, forbidden thoughts to nasty, forbidden deeds. Davidson does a remarkable job of conveying how the doctor feels, the line he walks between detached professionalism and intense arousal and invasion -- so much so that it takes a while to figure out that this is actually a consensual, planned-out scene between an established couple. And Davidson doesn't just get you inside the doctor's head -- he gets you inside the nurse's as well, conveying not just the man's excitement but his awareness of the woman's as well.

On the other very disappointing hand, we have "Forbidden Fruit" by Pearl Jones. This is a prime example of the "series of physical events" theory of porn writing. In it, a couple has a series of sexual encounters involving fruits and vegetables. The woman masturbates with a cucumber, and later on her husband fucks her with a cucumber, and then they go to the grocery store and buy more sexy fruits and vegetables, and then he goes down on her with the cucumber inside her, and then they eat raspberries off each other's bodies, and then she cuts a hole in a melon so he can fuck it, and then... and it goes on like this. Jones gives detailed descriptions of each act, occasionally even describing the couple's physical sensations... with no sense at all of what it means to them, what it is about fucking their produce that they find naughty or sexy or special, how it all feels to them emotionally as well as physically. Admittedly, the "sex with food" thing doesn't do much for me (and frankly, I'm hard-pressed to see what's so all-fired taboo about it). But I'm not particularly into the medical fetish, either; yet "After Hours" got me inside that fantasy -- and made me feel exactly what was hot about it.

Which leads me to Lesson 2: A porn story should be... well, a story. At the risk of sounding pretentious, it should have a narrative arc: it doesn't have to have a lot of non-sexual plot, or indeed any, but the characters should be in one place at the beginning of the story and someplace else at the end of it. You can get away with a series of disjointed sexual images in video porn, since it's such a visual medium; but unless it's written by an exceptionally good experimental writer, a porn story has to unfold, with some suspense about where things are going. This isn't just a literary nicety -- it makes the porn hotter, making it easier to identify with the characters, and giving it a sexual tension right along with the dramatic tension.

For an excellent example, take "James Dean, One Thousand Bucks, and a Long Summer Night" by Emilie Paris. "James Dean" starts out as a fairly standard (albeit unusually well-rendered) fantasy about a couple picking up a street hustler for a voyeuristic three-way. But as the story unfolds, the wife changes her mind about what she wants -- and takes charge of the scene, directing it into an area she and her husband hadn't anticipated or even agreed on. The moment when the wife takes control and shifts the fantasy from the standard "man watching his wife fuck another man" to the rather less commonly-seen "newly dominant wife watching her straight husband get fucked by another man" is a moment that's both unnerving and fiercely exciting. The story gets across the essence of what makes taboos hot -- not simply breaking society's rules and boundaries, but breaking your own, with the excitement of genuinely unfamiliar territory that might actually change your life while it's getting you off.

And of course, any good narrative has to have conflict. This may be the lesson Taboo needed the most. Far too many of its stories gloss right over the hard parts: couples venture into three-ways with never a blink of jealousy or insecurity, and try freaky new fetishes with pure eagerness and no hint of anxiety or doubt.

I could once again cite "Forbidden Fruit": a twelve-page story, packed with multiple sex acts, in which absolutely nothing happens. It's a near-perfect example of how the lack of development or conflict makes for truly boring smut. But why keep hammering on this one poor sad piece of supposed erotica when I actually have a better example of bad conflict-less porn: "Sometimes It's Better to Give." This "couple fucks their babysitter" story by Bryn Haniver is a fun fantasy (or it could be), loaded with potentially hot taboo elements: the depraved older couple seducing the innocent girl, the wicked employers taking advantage of their employee, the moment when the young woman's surprise and resistance turn to curiosity and lust, etc. etc. But the author goes to an absurd effort to de-fang the nastier parts and make it all safe and nice. The babysitter's actually their ex-babysitter, a horny and flirtatious college girl with loads of sexual experimenting already under her belt, and when the couple propositions her, she says yes with barely a blink of an eye. The author didn't let her be shocked or reluctant or even surprised, not even for one paragraph. As a result, there's no suspense, no conflict -- and no tension, sexual or otherwise. And it's not even remotely plausible.

Admittedly, I have a personal bias towards smut fiction that's plausible. It's hard to lose myself in a sex fantasy if I'm picking holes in the back story or thinking, "There's no way she would do that." But my desire for porn with real conflict and problems isn't just about believability. It's about sexual tension, the heat created by personal friction. As a marvelous counter-example, there's "Dinner Out" by Erin Sanders, one of the best, scariest fantasies I've read. It works because it lets the be both terrifying and safe. It's clear to both the reader and the "victim" that this is a couple acting out a fantasy and not a real -- and yet it lets the victim feel panic and helplessness, violation and pain. And it doesn't shy away from the tension in her own feelings, the unsettling and exciting disconnect between feeling violated by a stranger and feeling cared for by a loving partner. There's also "In the Back of Raquel" by P.S. Haven, an entirely different "couple tries a voyeuristic three way" story that lets the scene be imperfect, that explores and even revels in its weirdness and jealousy and competitiveness -- and that finds the fierce, driven, urgent intensity at the heart of the weirdness, the almost-angry tension that makes the story both arousing and believable.

And while we're on the subject of plausibility, we have our final lesson: respect for the fetish or fantasy. The two medical-play stories in Taboo are perfect examples of what I mean. I've already talked about "After Hours," (the perverse and lovely doctor/nurse medical exam fantasy) and how it made the slow unfolding of the story feel like exquisitely tantalizing foreplay. But the story also works because as the characters remain solidly in their roles, it lets you believe these dirty dirty things could really be happening, in a real medical exam. It lets you have the fantasy, lets you crawl inside it and feel it down to your blood vessels.

In contrast, we have "Medical Attention" by Skye Black. In this one, the medical attention doesn't get to be clinical and detached even for a minute before it becomes blatantly and explicitly sexual. It has no patience, doesn't let you believe that this could really be happening even for a paragraph: it jumps to the sex right away, giving you the barest taste of the fantasy -- and almost immediately smashing it to pieces.

Okay. All this babbling about the anatomy of a porn story is all very well and good. But it's not helping you decide whether to buy the damn book or not. What's my final verdict? Thumbs up or thumbs down?

On the whole, I'd say thumbs up. While Taboo is seriously uneven, enough of the stories are good to make the book worthwhile -- and several of the stories are better than just good. If you like porn that's about taboo sex and edge play, do check it out. And if you're intrigued and inspired by the idea of acting out edgy taboo sex fantasies in solid long-term relationships, then this is your baby. Just be prepared: you're going to have to do some skimming. Even more than you usually would with a porn fiction anthology.



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