Are You A Real Camper?  

rm_gerson42 52M
1752 posts
7/24/2006 3:37 pm

Last Read:
7/28/2006 1:28 pm

Are You A Real Camper?


Just recently, I moved all my camping stuff to my new house. I also have been reading a few posts regarding camping lately, most likely as it is summer. Some of them have used the terms or phrases "RV", "parked next to my camping spot" and "the people next to us were so loud".

As a beginning, I must say, if you can live in a vehicle where you are camping, can park adjacent to the place you are camping or can hear another group of campers next to you. You are not camping.

I grew up as a member of the Boy Scouts in Washington and subsequently was the Scoutmaster for my son's troop. Growing up, we went camping every month. 2-4 mile hike with a backpack always ending at some pristine snow fed lake where we dug latrines and hung are food from ropes linked to limbs on the trees. I have had weekends camping where the rain was so bad, I never left my tent. The best campers were those who could cook an entire meal without leaving their sleeping bag.

I have gone on no less than 4 fifty milers. Which means you are either walking or canoing... you got it... fifty miles. I have gone through "Winter Survival Training Camp" which ends with a trip to Mt. Rainier at Camp Muir, which is at 7,000 feet and the last base station on the way to the peak, where we built and slept in Igloos that we made with home made snow saws and then used my snowshoes as a sled on the way back down.

Camping has become a very loose term and I have written the following to insure that the general public is aware of and understands the five basic types of camping.

Yuppie Camping
To Real Campers, this is probably the second-most-annoying type of camping. Yuppie Campers are the type to buy $500 Gucci hiking boots, the ones you see ``leisurely'' reading their Wall Street Journal with their cell phone close at hand, and the ones that buy camping equipment for quantity, not quality. To Yuppie Campers, owning camping equipment is a status symbol, although they often don't even enjoy camping.

PROS:
• Status with materialistic Yuppie friends
CONS:
• Real Campers think you're an idiot
• Bloody waste of money

Pseudo-Camping
Pseudo-Camping is the most common form of camping, and the closest you can get to the real thing. The biggest flaw, however, is that it includes such things as running water, pre-chopped wood, a car, and neighbors. Lots of neighbors! That's right, I'm talking about drive-in sites.
PROS:
• Ideal for the beginner camper
• Gives the lazy and physically unfit a chance to camp
• Cooler in back of car = cold beer!
• Park run activities (i.e. slide shows) fun and informative
CONS:
• Noisy neighboring sites
• Night skies aren't as impressive as during Real Camping

Ultra-Pseudo-Camping
Ultra-Pseudo-Camping has got to be the most annoying type of camping to Real Campers. Ultra-Pseudo-Campers are the ones who go out and blow their money on those RVs with full size fridges, electric ovens/stoves, microwaves, and even TVs. Hell, I even saw one of them wandering a site in high-heel shoes!
PROS:
• You feel like you've never left home (some people are pros)
CONS: See Yuppie Camping

Wanna-Be Camping
Similar to Pseudo-Camping, but Wanna-Be Campers are the type to prefer something like a just off the road site in a National Park. They're the type to wait until temperatures are at least 75 degrees. They think of raccoons as really wild wildlife, not realizing that something like a black bear is actually very timid around humans and more scared of us than we are of them.

PROS:
• I guess it's good for partying or something like that
CONS:
• Nature? What's that?
• Attitudes like ``You mean I have to sterilize my own water?
• Call yourself an ``Outdoors man'' after spending the night in a tent in your backyard.

Real Camping
Imagine packing up your tent, food, clothing, etc., throwing it in a canoe (or on your back), and taking off in the canoe (or along the trail) out into the wilderness. While paddling (or walking), you notice a moose and her calf feeding at the side of the lake (I've got some great pictures!), or an otter floating lazily on its back, basking in the sun. While drifting, you sit and listen to the soft, gentle sounds of nature. A bird singing from the trees, the waves splash against the shore, and somewhere in the distance, you hear the lonely howl of a wandering wolf. No cars, no radios, just nature at its best.

As the sun is setting, you find a suitable spot, pitch your tent, and go about hunting for suitable wood for an evening fire. After a hearty meal, it's time to relax; time to sit back and enjoy your quiet heaven. Looking up on a clear night, the stars appear before you in numbers that you'll never see from within 50 miles of the city. From out in the water comes the eerie call and response of rivaling loons. Soon, it's time to turn in and be lulled to sleep by the gentle surrounding sounds. Waking up refreshed the next morning, you take the time to watch the awe-inspiring sunrise through a blanket of mist rising from the lake, before setting out to do it all over again. This, my friends, is REAL Camping.

PROS:
• How can you beat thousands of new stars?
• Nature, nature, nature!
• A Real Camper can have a safe fire under ANY condition
• Very romantic
• Only $4.25 per night
CONS:
• No beer
• Forgetting to hang your food from a tree out of a bear's reach often equals no food
• It could take a while to get assistance in case of an accident
• No cooler = a diet of non-perishable and freeze-dried meals.


This post, while intended to be viewed by those who appreciate my blog and in turn whose blogs I appreciate, should in no way be construed as an attempt to comment whore. Should anyone decide to comment, they do so at there own discretion and without coercion by author of said blog.


gerson42 - but My friends can call me ger




bipolybabe 54F

7/24/2006 4:49 pm

This is my idea of "camping."

I lived for four years in a cabin in the woods, 20 miles from a bar or supermarket, a cabin inhabited by one squirrel high on cat food and a great many mice. An oak tree grew up out of the ground at my front door. The river ran past my back door.

To combat the mice and feisty squirrel, I found myself a cat, a HUNTER who turned out to be a Latin Lover in disguise (now called ANTONIO BANDERAS). In the first month after I acquired him, my cat moved from the end of my bed up to my chest so I could scratch his face and the top of his head. Now, he chooses to be near me, resting on the softest surface of every room I'm in. He never did catch or even examine the fucking mice. So, I lived with them and loved him.

That is the extent of my desire to enjoy the great outdoors. My daughter and I agree that room service rocks.

BPB

BPB

Check out my blog Bi-Poly-Babe for more sensual, sexual pleasure!


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:13 pm:
Room service does rock. Gotta see the squirrel that was high.
ger - (Replying to comments assuming that commentator commented freely and without expectation.)

LustyTaurus 48M  
21253 posts
7/24/2006 5:44 pm

Pseudo-Camping
Pseudo-Camping is the most common form of camping, and the closest you can get to the real thing. The biggest flaw, however, is that it includes such things as running water, pre-chopped wood, a car, and neighbors. Lots of neighbors! That's right, I'm talking about drive-in sites.

When we get out of the city to a park as a family, this is what we do. I try to at least make day trips as far away from the site as we can go and still get back for dark.

I have been "real" camping, dragging my canoe from lake to lake or around a waterfall...and I loved it!

The Yuppie and Ultra-Pseudo campers drive me the craziest...


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:14 pm:
You, are a very well-rounded camper.
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frangipanigal 44F
10406 posts
7/24/2006 5:47 pm

I took Little Frangi Pseudo-Camping...she was only 2 at the time so had to take it easy!

We are lucky that we have a national park (entrance) 10 minutes from home, and 45 minutes into the park there is a great "camping" site.She loved it, our spot was right on the water...gorgeous! I loved that there was a toilet block not too far away...

Being a Girl Guide myself in my youth, I will say I have experienced "real camping" as well, but not for a long, long time.

Frangi x


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:17 pm:
That sounds like a great time, Ive done the Pseudo-Camping too, with 4 kids. Sometimes just more practicle.
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rm_truedom2 55M
663 posts
7/24/2006 5:49 pm

Now you talking. I've done some multi-day rafting trips into the Gila wilderness. The great thing about rafting is you can take that cooler full of beer. Ahhhh...the memories....nothing like tossing the canteen full of scotch between rafts at 10 AM just to take the chill off.


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:22 pm:
I should have mentioned along with not being able to take cold beer in Real Camping, you can bring Scotch.
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amoldenough 69F
16436 posts
7/24/2006 6:26 pm

I have been "real camping" several times, but it has been years and years. In "real camping", you can see a snake eat a frog, or you can wake up in the morning needing to go so bad, but you're afraid to leave the tent, because you smell a skunk. It also means blisters on your heels from walking in to the campsite with the wrong shoes or socks. It was fun, however.

"Don't cry because it's over; smile because it happened."


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:23 pm:
There are a few downsides. lol
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earthShiva 59M

7/24/2006 7:20 pm

When does camping become real for me? Not until we're remote enough to do the WILD THANG outside the tent without somebody hearing and calling search and rescue...

Dance naked, hermano!


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:24 pm:
As a 17-18 year old, my friends and I used to always go out. We actually ran into Jungle Jane (her name was actually Jane) who was camping alone. She must have been 25-30. She ended up sleeping inbetween all us guys with us jocking for position.
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mickdevil 50M/52F
3496 posts
7/24/2006 7:20 pm

I'm thinking I never should of watched deliverence lol

I'm not a camping devil lol give me a hotel suite


Mick & Devil FWB
click me

Just Living Life


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:25 pm:
There is that. Never had a problem myself. Hotel suite for you it is.
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southrnpeach333 50F

7/24/2006 7:54 pm

we actually do a little of it all. depending on time of year and how much time we have...some times we back pack in and sleep on a tent by a river somewhere...others we pull our RV up to the lake and meet other families and cook out together and boat and let the kids run around. with all the boys that i have when we go to touristy places it is much easier to stay in the RV than try to coop them up in a hotel room. one of the best things is camping out on the beach...nothing like it.


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:27 pm:
Great combination. Depends on time available and effort. It's nice to show the kids how to enjoy being out there. Always would take the kids on little mini-hikes when they were ready. The rule always was, if you go... you walk... don't ride.
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OboesHonedIambs 62F

7/24/2006 8:13 pm

This is my idea of camping: load up the car with a largish tent, carpets for inside the tent, air mattress, sleeping bags, tent table, camp kitchen, some chairs, a cooler full of groceries, maybe a bottle of wine and enough clothes for "variable" weather conditions for 4 days, and some reading material. Drive as far off the beaten path as the forest service allows. Find a nice spot and set up. Alternately, read, amble, hike, read, cook, dine, and repeat. When the weather is perfect drag the bag out of the tent and crash under the stars. I've camped like this well into October.

The modification to this is SCA camping... change clothes to garb, cloaks, walking sticks, add lanterns, pre-cook half the food for 3 weeks ahead of time, freeze and pack carefully; Join up with 300-500 people, watch the guys beat the crap out of each other with swords, battle axes, stave, and maces made out of rattan, foam and duct tap. Enjoy the fighters come from the melees with shit eating grins at the pleasure of another middle ages worth of battle-bonding. It's more fun than watchin' football! And for milady's leisure, her embroidery is always at hand, not to mention strolling past the merchant's rows. Of course, this is all done on forest land so there is the terrain to contend with -- up the hill and down the hill wearing 15 lbs of garb, and skirting loose rocks and occassional cactus, as well as curtsying and otherwise playing nice with the local dukes and such. Spend 4 or 5 days doing that.

Instant Human -- Just Add Coffee


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:29 pm:
I've heard of the SCA camping. That sounds like fun. Also like the idea of pulling the bag out. When forced to do Pseudo Camping I would always do that.
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smoothnjuicy4u 50F

7/24/2006 8:19 pm

gsoh I love to go camping the 'real way" but since I have back injuries we have to take a small pop up, but for my young boys sake we rough it in any other way we can


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:30 pm:
Small pop up's pass, especially when you got the crew.
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ProtonicMan 47M

7/24/2006 8:36 pm

Hey, Ger!

I like your breakdown.

I have done the Real Camping thing. I spent enough time in the Boy Scouts to know how to do it. We didn't do much backpacking in my troop, though, and I never made it to any of the high-adventure places.

My second wife gave me a great Christmas present once: a 3-day, fully outfitted canoe trip in the Boundary Waters between northern Minnesota and Canada. That was a nice trip, but 3 days is just not enough. Too much busting ass to get to the next campsite. A week would have been nice, so we could just stay put for a day or two, enjoy the wilderness or take a day trip if we felt like it.

Now, I'm just lazy, although I do miss getting out to see the stars like that. Maybe when I grow up...

TJ


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:30 pm:
That sounds like a great trip.
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angelofmercy5 58F
17881 posts
7/24/2006 9:00 pm

Honestly.....my idea of camping is the Holiday Inn! lol


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:31 pm:
Your the 4th hotelier and/or room service.... wait SD just popped up.. I already know what she's gonna say... so we will make it 5.
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rm_AnOddGirl 57F
3469 posts
7/24/2006 9:54 pm

Camping: No one around for miles, lake, fish, stars. That's camping!!


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:32 pm:
A women after my heart.
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Looking4sex44240 54F

7/24/2006 10:53 pm

Me and a few friends go on a camping trip every July for6 days to the forest. We are all in tents, cook in the bonfire, take our baths in 50 degrees water. No radios, cells phones, no campers or RVs. We cut our own wood. We have a great time.


DIVISION77 39M  
8321 posts
7/25/2006 12:10 am

So what do you consider military training out in the middle of the forests of Savannah, GA?

Eating MRE's and drinking water as the only sustenance...

No RV's, no campers, no civilization within miles....

Is this camping or something more primitive?

DIV

"My every move is a calculated step, to bring me closer to embrace an early death." -Tupac Shakur


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:33 pm:
Sounds like camping, except for the military training part. Not sure if that sounds fun or not. Would be interested in hearing more about.
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SacredStarDance

7/25/2006 2:42 am

pro camper here.. well I was..Have not been in years..Dad would take us every year... with just a knife..blanket.. some water.. taught us how to survive if we needed to by paying attention to nature.. how to find north.. follow a stream.. the stars..if theres no fish or birds.. don't drink the water..
was very helpful when caught in a few natural disasters and when I got lost in the Tahoe forrest for 18 hours i just followed the stream that lead me to some rv camp ground..

under the stars
We choose to write
you choose what you comprehend.
read twice and be nice
every key stroke... has a heart beat


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:35 pm:
You could have borrowed my trusty compass. What great experiences they sound like.
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Kaliedascope61 41M
4084 posts
7/25/2006 4:00 am

I love camping, and all though I never made an igloo (not much snow in texas) I have been miles and miles and miles away from anywhere out on a prarie or farm sleeping in a bag under the stars. Its beautiful and inspiring.


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:36 pm:
That's the picture. Different scenery but definately the same spirit. The Igloo thing was overated, although fun to say I did it.
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curious082385 31F
4925 posts
7/25/2006 4:19 am

Damn straight!
It's not real camping unless you are packing it all in on your back....if you can't fit it in the backpack or figure out a way to tie it on to the pack frame...it's not going!!!
Pillows?? Pfff...who needs them? Stuff some clothes into a sweatshirt and roll it into a ball.
And Iodine-tablet-flavored water is yummy...really!

We will occasionally use National Park campgrounds, but for the most part, Curious and family prefer to just park the car somewhere, pick a direction and start hiking until we find a pretty place to stop.


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:38 pm:
I have one of those filters for the water, works well and tastes great. Pack it in, pack it out.
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Phuc_Buddy 46M

7/25/2006 8:48 am

Okay Ger now I'll have to ask what category I should consider myself since I did the whole boy scout thing when I was younger and now do the pseudo camping (still in a tent mind you but damn it is nice to have a cooler with cold beer). Beside sometimes those camping places are down right party central - if you find the right one.


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:37 pm:
I'm not saying anything wrong with the pseudo camping, done my share and had a great time... and then... there is the cold beer.
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TheRealThing655 48F
9558 posts
7/25/2006 9:39 am

I'm a pseudo camper....but I need a real man to take me real camping....c'mon up here Ger.


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:50 pm:
Aaah, the cascades. Get out there on the way to Snoqualmie or Stevens Passes. Find a trail head, hike on up to one of 100's of snow fed lakes with the crystal clear water. I'll be up.
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wickedeasy 66F  
25377 posts
7/25/2006 2:20 pm

nopenopenope

i need an indoor bathroom and a glass of good pinot grigio -

shudders at the very idea of camping

WE

You cannot conceive the many without the one.


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 3:50 pm:
Your going and you're going to like it.
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earthShiva 59M

7/25/2006 3:55 pm


gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 4:24 pm:
As a 17-18 year old, my friends and I used to always go out. We actually ran into Jungle Jane (her name was actually Jane) who was camping alone. She must have been 25-30. She ended up sleeping inbetween all us guys with us jocking for position.
ger - (Replying to comments assuming that commentator commented freely and without expectation.)


Well, no wonder you like camping so much! And it's so much easier if you don't have to pack out your "entertainment system".

BTW, I forgot to ask. Gucci doesn't really make hiking boots, do they? (If so, that explains volumes on loss of habitat...)


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 4:14 pm:
Just keep going out looking for another Jane. Just a sec.... nope... looked it up. They don't actually make them.
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wickedeasy 66F  
25377 posts
7/25/2006 4:38 pm

can't make me - sticks out tongue

You cannot conceive the many without the one.


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 10:17 pm:
can too!

HBowt2 58F

7/25/2006 5:25 pm

noooooooooooooo......not a camping bone in my body...


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/25/2006 10:17 pm:
That's it, we're going! End of subject.

Mermaidslut 49F

7/26/2006 6:47 pm

1 state beach park, pre spring season - 12 weeks
1 tent
1 fire pit
unlimited supply of drift/firewood
lagoon

no neighbors except the ground squirls
sound of the waves

3 friends


rm_gerson42 replies on 7/27/2006 2:41 pm:
That sounds like a lot of fun. My family and I would do that for a week or so at a time, I would even commute back and forth to work during part of the day.
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rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
7/28/2006 9:55 pm

Glad I can get in on this one. Those boy scout jamboree's were the greatest. Especially the winter ones, igloo's or just digging a hole in the snow nice and warm. Then I grew a little ole=der and got to go on the two week trips in the BWCA (boundary water's canoe area) Never with a canoe though you can carry too much crap in one of those, use a kayak that's real camping, no room for t.p.(and the mosquito's had wood ticks for wing tanks) Then I did the survival training in the military, let me tell ya bout a birthday supper i had once of rabbit eye's and guts. Not very tasty, but nutritious. I was dropped off three miles off the coast for that one and had to get to the top of Mt. Rainer for pick-up. (FAF then I had me a tent, then I bought a boat to get to some better places. Now that I am so much older I purchased a little 15' camper. No running water no bathroom just a little fridge ( still need to carry food in cooler's (and a couple for beer) But I have had arthritis in my shoulders since I was 11 from camping. I can't take real camping anymore, so I use my little camper on hunting trips or I go to my cabin with no running water or electricity.

I still love camping though


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