Religiosity  

nontoxicmale 64M
132 posts
8/21/2006 12:19 pm

Last Read:
9/11/2006 7:36 am

Religiosity

This is the word of the day. It is the one thing that stands in the way of doing what I want versus what is right. It is the reason that terrorists act against infidels. It is the reason people stand in judgement of others.

I am all too often confused by what I feel and what my faith dictates. Welcome to my quandary. Does guilt come from fear or does it come from conscience? Can it be both?

This is all related to what I do and what I want to do versus the teachings (repressions?) of my religion. Some things make perfect sense to me. Others seem as if they are control issues of the church rather than true morality. Of course, that may just be my way of rationalizing and justifying my immoral thoughts and actions.

I'm tired. So why don't you weigh in on this.


CravesChocolate 56M
88 posts
8/24/2006 11:19 am

I was raised as a Seventh Day Adventist and went to their schools through high school. Shortly after, I denounced the church due to too many unanswered questions and what I percieved to be as unreconciled hypocracies. What followed was a few years bouncing between aethisism and agnosticism. At the same time, I was experimenting with psychedelics and exploring new age thought. What I soon realized was that God existed in all of life and well outside of religion. Then when I started studying world religions I realized that they were all created by men and all had their own self serving agenda. Christianity was created by an aethiest, centuties after the death of Jesus the Christ. Modern day christianity has little to do with the his teachings and in many cases runs contrary to the most important fundamentals of his teachings. God does not have a religion. Religions are the opiate of the people and are used to control them. If you believe that you are a product of God's creation that it follows that you must believe that you were meant to use this incredible brain that we only use a small percentage of. The most liberating thing in the world is letting go of man's laws, as dictated by religions, and work on your own enlightenment as demonstrated by Budddha, Jesus, Krishna, and all of the enlightened masters. It's not easy to let go of a lifetime of conditioning but it sure is liberating and gives you a much closer relationship with God!


nontoxicmale 64M

8/25/2006 7:43 am

    Quoting CravesChocolate:
    I was raised as a Seventh Day Adventist and went to their schools through high school. Shortly after, I denounced the church due to too many unanswered questions and what I percieved to be as unreconciled hypocracies. What followed was a few years bouncing between aethisism and agnosticism. At the same time, I was experimenting with psychedelics and exploring new age thought. What I soon realized was that God existed in all of life and well outside of religion. Then when I started studying world religions I realized that they were all created by men and all had their own self serving agenda. Christianity was created by an aethiest, centuties after the death of Jesus the Christ. Modern day christianity has little to do with the his teachings and in many cases runs contrary to the most important fundamentals of his teachings. God does not have a religion. Religions are the opiate of the people and are used to control them. If you believe that you are a product of God's creation that it follows that you must believe that you were meant to use this incredible brain that we only use a small percentage of. The most liberating thing in the world is letting go of man's laws, as dictated by religions, and work on your own enlightenment as demonstrated by Budddha, Jesus, Krishna, and all of the enlightened masters. It's not easy to let go of a lifetime of conditioning but it sure is liberating and gives you a much closer relationship with God!
I am curious to know who the atheist was that created Christianity. ALl the history that I have read leads back to men of faith in the first century. But maybe I need to do a little more research. I am very aware that I believe a lot and know very little.


sooloo2 63F

8/28/2006 10:57 am

I can appreciate your candor. What we believe does wound up being in direct conflict with our behavior many times. Now, how do we reconcile the two. God only knows.


moonlightphoenix 45F
6508 posts
9/8/2006 8:24 am

I respect other people's beliefs, even if they are not my own. I do not accept religion in my own life because I feel it has so very little to do with spirituality. The "teachings" are more indoctrinations than anything, and for political/financial/power gain. And so few actually apply them to their own day to day lives.

I think spirituality is the most important, personal belief system one can have. It can and should permeate and influence your every move in life. To me, so many people are raised in different faiths that are handed down to them from their parents, without really doing any searching on their own. How can you not question and examine the most important belief you hold?

I went to a Catholic Jr. High. I wasn't Catholic. But my teacher had what I continue to think is a most profound approach...he encouraged us all to question the church and our own beliefs, because he said that we needed to KNOW what the church stood for and accept it and understand it to understand ourselves. I still believe this.

I have my own spirituality. To me, to belong to a church or organized faith, I have to agree 100% with everything that faith espouses. As of yet, I haven't found one.

I'm hoping none of this came out condescending or preachy or anything like that, because I've not meant to. It's such a fine line.


nontoxicmale 64M

9/8/2006 11:08 am

    Quoting moonlightphoenix:
    I respect other people's beliefs, even if they are not my own. I do not accept religion in my own life because I feel it has so very little to do with spirituality. The "teachings" are more indoctrinations than anything, and for political/financial/power gain. And so few actually apply them to their own day to day lives.

    I think spirituality is the most important, personal belief system one can have. It can and should permeate and influence your every move in life. To me, so many people are raised in different faiths that are handed down to them from their parents, without really doing any searching on their own. How can you not question and examine the most important belief you hold?

    I went to a Catholic Jr. High. I wasn't Catholic. But my teacher had what I continue to think is a most profound approach...he encouraged us all to question the church and our own beliefs, because he said that we needed to KNOW what the church stood for and accept it and understand it to understand ourselves. I still believe this.

    I have my own spirituality. To me, to belong to a church or organized faith, I have to agree 100% with everything that faith espouses. As of yet, I haven't found one.

    I'm hoping none of this came out condescending or preachy or anything like that, because I've not meant to. It's such a fine line.

I appreciate your insights. At the same time, I can't help but feel that it is very easy to be a cafeteria spiritual person, picking and choosing only those precepts that feel good and relieve us of responsibility for the immoral or hurtful actions that we may choose. Fulfillment of personal desire is not always the "right" path. Sometimes our personal desires need to be subjegated to that which is better for people as a whole rather than doing or accepting only that which makes me feel good.


moonlightphoenix 45F
6508 posts
9/8/2006 8:08 pm

I appreciate your insights. At the same time, I can't help but feel that it is very easy to be a cafeteria spiritual person, picking and choosing only those precepts that feel good and relieve us of responsibility for the immoral or hurtful actions that we may choose. Fulfillment of personal desire is not always the "right" path. Sometimes our personal desires need to be subjegated to that which is better for people as a whole rather than doing or accepting only that which makes me feel good.

I understand what you're saying, but my own personal code of ethics often causes me to put my own self interests at the bottom of the list. It's always tempting to take the easy path in life, but just because I don't subscribe to an "official" religion, doesn't make it less responsible or ethically inferior. This is the temptation with organized religion...to automatically suspect anyone who doesn't subscribe as ethically or morally lacking. I'm sorry, but it's insulting and ignorant.

My beliefs are my own. Just because someone doesn't hold the same beliefs I do, does not cause me to think their morals or ethics less than my own. Quite the opposite. I believe most people are good and usually responsible with no intent to hurt others. Of course, this has hurt me in the long run, but I'd rather give people the benefit of the doubt than live any other way.

If you wish, I can list my beliefs for you and my daily examples of living such beliefs. Then you can adequately judge whether or not I'm a cafeteria spiritualist or not. It's easy to judge others. I try not to. Just part of my own code of ethics. It's not always easy. But I try.


nontoxicmale 64M

9/10/2006 12:26 pm

    Quoting moonlightphoenix:
    I appreciate your insights. At the same time, I can't help but feel that it is very easy to be a cafeteria spiritual person, picking and choosing only those precepts that feel good and relieve us of responsibility for the immoral or hurtful actions that we may choose. Fulfillment of personal desire is not always the "right" path. Sometimes our personal desires need to be subjegated to that which is better for people as a whole rather than doing or accepting only that which makes me feel good.

    I understand what you're saying, but my own personal code of ethics often causes me to put my own self interests at the bottom of the list. It's always tempting to take the easy path in life, but just because I don't subscribe to an "official" religion, doesn't make it less responsible or ethically inferior. This is the temptation with organized religion...to automatically suspect anyone who doesn't subscribe as ethically or morally lacking. I'm sorry, but it's insulting and ignorant.

    My beliefs are my own. Just because someone doesn't hold the same beliefs I do, does not cause me to think their morals or ethics less than my own. Quite the opposite. I believe most people are good and usually responsible with no intent to hurt others. Of course, this has hurt me in the long run, but I'd rather give people the benefit of the doubt than live any other way.

    If you wish, I can list my beliefs for you and my daily examples of living such beliefs. Then you can adequately judge whether or not I'm a cafeteria spiritualist or not. It's easy to judge others. I try not to. Just part of my own code of ethics. It's not always easy. But I try.

If it appeared that I was pointing to you and making a judgement, nothing could be further from the truth. I am actually looking at myself and questioning whether my acceptance or rejection of the precepts of my chosen faith are a matter5 of appropriate ethical choice or simply a means for me to be picking and choosing that which supports my actions and desires.


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