69 SUCH THINGS HAPPEN  

jasonabadboy4u 29M
48 posts
6/3/2006 6:05 pm

Last Read:
7/7/2006 7:00 am

69 SUCH THINGS HAPPEN

69 SUCH THINGS HAPPEN
When Bill Nelson's cow stopped giving milk, he called the
veterinarian. "There's nothing wrong with that cow," the
vet said. "She's just stubborn. That, or some witch got
hold of her." Bill and the vet both laughed. "That old hag,
Addie Fitch, I guess she's the closest we've got to a witch
around here," the vet said. "But witches have gone out of
style, haven't they?" Bill had had a run-in with Addie
Fitch the month before. He had hit her cat with his car and
killed it. "I'm really sorry, Addie Fitch," he told
her. "I'll get you a new cat, just as pretty, just as
good." Her eyes filled with hate. "I raised that cat from a
kitten," she said. "I loved her. You'll be sorry for this,
Bill Nelson." Bill sent her a new cat and heard nothing
more. Then his cow stopped giving milk. Next his old truck
broke down. After that, his wife fell and broke her
arm. "We're having a lot of bad luck," he thought. Then he
thought, "Maybe it is Addie Fitch gettin' even." And
then, "Hey--you don't believe in witches. You're just
upset." But Bill's grandpa believed in witches. He had once
told Bill that there was only one sure way to stop a witch
from causing trouble. "You find a black walnut tree," he
said, "and you draw her picture on it. Then you mark an X
where her heart is, and you drive a nail into the X. Every
day you drive it in a little deeper. "If she's causing the
trouble," he said, "she'll feel pain. When she can't stand
it anymore, she'll come to you, or send somebody, and try
to borrow something. If you give her what she want's, that
breaks the power of the nail, and she'll go on tormenting
you. But if you don't she'll have to stop--or the pain will
kill her." That's what his nice, gentle old grandpa
believed. "It's pure craziness," Bill thought. Of course,
his grandpa didn't have much schooling. Bill had been to
college. He knew better. Then Bill's dog Joe, a perfectly
healthy dog, dropped dead, just like that. It made Bill
angry. Despite all his schooling, he thought, "Maybe it is
Addie Fitch after all." He got a read crayon from his son's
room, and a hammer and a nail, and went into the woods. He
found a black walnut tree and drew a picture of Addie Fitch
on it. He made an X where her heart was, like his grandpa
had said to do. With the hammer he drove the nail a little
way into the X. Then he went home. "I feel like a fool," he
told his wife. "You should," she said. The next day a boy
named Timmy Logan came by. "Addie Fitch isn't feeling
well," he said. She wonders if she could borrow some sugar
from you." Bill Nelson stared at Timmy in amazement. He
took a deep breath. "Tell her I'm sorry, but I don't have
any sugar right now," he said. When Timmy Logan left, Bill
went back to the Walnut tree and drove the nail in another
inch. The next day the boy was back. "Addie Fitch is pretty
sick," he said. "She's wondering if you've got any sugar
yet." "Tell her I'm sorry," Bill Nelson said. "But I still
don't have any." Bill went out into the woods and drove the
nail in another inch. The following day the boy was
back. "Addie Fitch is getting sicker," he said. "She really
needs some sugar." "Tell her I still don't have any," Bill
Answered. Bill's wife was angry. "You've got to stop this,"
she said. "If this mumbo jumbo works it's like
murder." "I'll stop when she does," he said. Toward dusk he
stood in the yard staring at the ridge where the old lady
lived, wondering what was going on up there. Then, in the
half darkness, he saw Addie Fitch coming slowly down the
hill toward him. With her pinched, bony face and her old
black coat, she did look like a witch. As she got closer,
Bill saw that she could barely walk. "Maybe I'm really
hurting her," he thought. He ran to get his hammer to pull
the nail out. But before he could leave, Addie Fitch was in
the yard, her face twisted with rage. "First you killed my
cat," she said. "Then you wouldn't give me a bit of sugar
when I needed it." She swore at him, and fell dead at his
feet. "I'm not surprised that she dropped dead that way,"
the doctor said later. "She was very old, maybe ninety. It
was her heart, of course." "Somebody I know thought Addie
Fitch had witched him," Bill went on. "He drew a picture of
her on a tree, then drove a nail into it to maker her
stop." "That's an old superstition," the doctor said. "But
people like us don't believe in that sort of thing, do we?"


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