MEMORIAL DAY to me  

rm_cru1972 44M
3520 posts
5/28/2006 3:26 pm

Last Read:
7/27/2010 10:16 pm

MEMORIAL DAY to me

I know there are a lot of you who look at Memorial day as, "The start of summer", or just another " Three day weekend". But Memorial Day to me is steeped in deep tradition as in some of the information you will read below. I however, having served my time in the United States Air Force, during Operation's Desert Storm, and Desert Calm, have my own meaning of Memorial Day. I go through the local cemetaries and place flags on military persons graves. I don't care if you do nothing like that, But I do ask you, PLEASE at least observe a moment of silence, for those service members, who have given their lives, and for those who are still with us. Thank you for the patience.

"BIVOUAC OF THE DEAD"

The muffled drum's sad roll has beat
The soldier's last tattoo;
No more on life's parade shall meet
That brave and fallen few.
On Fame's eternal camping-ground
Their silent tents are spread,
And Glory guards, with solemn round,
The bivouac of the dead.
No rumor of the foe's advance
Now swells upon the wind;
Nor troubled thought at midnight haunts
Of loved ones left behind;
No vision of the morrow's strife
The warrior's dream alarms;
No braying horn nor screaming fife
At dawn shall call to arms.
Their shriveled swords are red with rust,
Their plumed heads are bowed,
Their haughty banner, trailed in dust,
Is now their martial shroud.
And plenteous funeral tears have washed
The red stains from each brow,
And the proud forms, by battle gashed
Are free from anguish now.
The neighing troop, the flashing blade,
The bugle's stirring blast,
The charge, the dreadful cannonade,
The din and shout, are past;
Nor war's wild note nor glory's peal
Shall thrill with fierce delight
Those breasts that nevermore may feel
The rapture of the fight.
Like the fierce northern hurricane
That sweeps the great plateau,
Flushed with the triumph yet to gain,
Came down the serried foe,
Who heard the thunder of the fray
Break o'er the field beneath,
Knew well the watchword of that day
Was "Victory or death!"
Long had the doubtful conflict raged
O'er all that stricken plain,
For never fiercer fight had waged
The vengeful blood of Spain;
And still the storm of battle blew,
Still swelled the gory tide;
Not long, our stout old chieftain knew,
Such odds his strength could bide.
Twas in that hour his stern command
Called to a martyr's grave
The flower of his beloved land,
The nation's flag to save.
By rivers of their father's gore
His first-born laurels grew,
And well he deemed the sons would pour
Their lives for glory too.
For many a mother's breath has swept
O'er Angostura's plain --
And long the pitying sky has wept
Above its moldered slain.
The raven's scream, or eagle's flight,
Or shepherd's pensive lay,
Alone awakes each sullen height
That frowned o'er that dread fray.
Sons of the Dark and Bloody Ground
Ye must not slumber there,
Where stranger steps and tongues resound
Along the heedless air.
Your own proud land's heroic soil
Shall be your fitter grave;
She claims from war his richest spoil --
The ashes of her brave.
Thus 'neath their parent turf they rest,
Far from the gory field,
Borne to a Spartan mother's breast
On many a bloody shield;
The sunshine of their native sky
Smiles sadly on them here,
And kindred eyes and hearts watch by
The heroes sepulcher.
Rest on embalmed and sainted dead!
Dear as the blood ye gave;
No impious footstep shall here tread
The herbage of your grave;
Nor shall your glory be forgot
While fame her records keeps,
Or Honor points the hallowed spot
Where Valor proudly sleeps.
Yon marble minstrel's voiceless stone
In deathless song shall tell,
When many a vanquished ago has flown,
The story how ye fell;
Nor wreck, nor change, nor winter's blight,
Nor Time's remorseless doom,
Shall dim one ray of glory's light
That gilds your deathless tomb.

the flag

On Memorial Day the flag should be flown at half-staff from sunrise until noon only, then raised briskly to the top of the staff until sunset, in honor of the nation’s battle heroes.

history of Memorial Day

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans – the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) – established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.
The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

History of Taps

The 24-note bugle call known as “taps” is thought to be a revision of a French bugle signal, called “tattoo,” that notified soldiers to cease an evening’s drinking and return to their barracks or garrisons. It was sounded one hour before the bugle call that brought the military day to an end by ordering the extinguishing of fires and lights. The last five measures of the tattoo resemble the modern day "Taps."
The word “taps” is an alteration of the obsolete word “taptoo,” derived from the Dutch “taptoe.” Taptoe was the command -- “Tap toe!” -- to shut (“toe to” the “tap” of a keg.
The revision that gave us present-day taps was made during America ’s Civil War by Union Gen. Daniel Adams Butterfield, heading a brigade camped at Harrison Landing, Va., near Richmond. Up to that time, the U.S. Army’s infantry call to end the day was the French final call, "L’Extinction des feux.” Gen. Butterfield decided the “lights out” music was too formal to signal the day’s end. One day in July 1862, he recalled the tattoo music and hummed a version of it to an aide, who wrote it down in music. Butterfield then asked the brigade bugler, Oliver W. Norton, to play the notes and, after listening, lengthened and shortened them while keeping his original melody.
He ordered Norton to play this new call at the end of each day thereafter, instead of the regulation call. The music was heard and appreciated by other brigades, who asked for copies and adopted this bugle call. It was even adopted by Confederate buglers. This music was made the official Army bugle call after the war, but not given the name “taps” until 1874.
The first time taps was played at a military funeral may also have been in Virginia soon after Butterfield composed it. Union Capt. John Tidball, head of an artillery battery, ordered it played for the burial of a cannoneer killed in action. Not wanting to reveal the battery’s position in the woods to the enemy nearby, Tidball substituted taps for the traditional three rifle volleys fired over the grave. Taps was played at the funeral of Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson 10 months after it was composed. Army infantry regulations by 1891 required taps to be played at military funeral ceremonies. Taps now is played by the military at burial and memorial services and is still used to signal “lights out” at day’s end5/28/06

The Americans who served DURING Wartime Only

America's Wars Total
U.S. Military Service During War......43,185,893

Battle Deaths......................652,696

Other Deaths (In Theater)........14,416

Other Deaths in Service (Non-Theater).....525,223

Non-mortal Woundings...................1,447,281

Living War Veterans..................18,155,573

Living Veterans (War & Peacetime)......24,387,036

Update: I forgot to say this is through out america's history including things like the Civil War and the American indian war, All wars we have been in Foriegn and Domestic


oldude1946 70M

5/28/2006 3:52 pm

I'm a two time Vietnam Vet, I'm with ya bro.


micahbiguns 50M

5/28/2006 3:52 pm

Good stuff cru Thanks for sharing


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/28/2006 4:03 pm

    Quoting oldude1946:
    I'm a two time Vietnam Vet, I'm with ya bro.
Giving you my best salute Oldude. It was people like you that made me choose my path, yet Desert Storm did not happen till I was a week from basic graduation


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/28/2006 4:46 pm

Thanks for the kind words, and too you and youre have a great Memoirial Day


rm_mrree482 68M

5/28/2006 5:09 pm

Viet vet too (Navy), well done and thank you!
Too bad that info wasn't on every front page nation wide this w/e


Whispersoftly5 52F
15176 posts
5/28/2006 6:13 pm

This is an incredible and powerful post! Thank you for this post and for serving the country! I agree with mrree482 this information should be on the front pages of all newpapers. Incredible. Thank you!

Whisper...


twirly_girl 47F

5/28/2006 7:11 pm

Thank you.
Not many people take Memorial Day seriously
or even truly understand what is all about.
Wish I could help you with those flags.

-Nic

-Nikki


catseyes23 61F

5/28/2006 7:39 pm

A wonderfully thought out post. Thank you for sharing it, Cru.

Cats


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/28/2006 8:04 pm

    Quoting rm_mrree482:
    Viet vet too (Navy), well done and thank you!
    Too bad that info wasn't on every front page nation wide this w/e
I salute you too sir, I don't see why it can't be in the newspaper, for I know nothing of this puter stuff & I could find all the information. It just goes to show how the media really is


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/28/2006 8:06 pm

    Quoting rm_yummmy669:
    Very good post. We all need to remember. My grandfather served WWII and I have a long line of family memebers serving past and present. Thanks to all.

    yummmy
I honor your family, for they have chose the destination they wanted. Hopefully they are all safe.


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/28/2006 8:20 pm

    Quoting Whispersoftly5:
    This is an incredible and powerful post! Thank you for this post and for serving the country! I agree with mrree482 this information should be on the front pages of all newpapers. Incredible. Thank you!

    Whisper...
Thank you for the wonderful compliments whisper.I was happy to do it for you and everyone in this wonderful place I have found so many friends. I did it for them


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/28/2006 8:30 pm

    Quoting twirly_girl:
    Thank you.
    Not many people take Memorial Day seriously
    or even truly understand what is all about.
    Wish I could help you with those flags.

    -Nic
I take Memorial Day, and Veteran's Day as the most serious of all holiday's, for I am both. And I am PROUD to be among the names of veterans worldwide, For we are all brothers. And no one is able to take that from us.

As for the flags, I would love to have you there by my side, because I know how you feel about this day.


angelofmercy5 58F
17881 posts
5/28/2006 8:44 pm

This was a great post Chris. My husband was in the Navy for 23 years beginning during the Vietnam war. I was with him for almost all of those years as a Navy wife. And I'm proud of him and all the others who serve our country. We ALL need to remember!


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/28/2006 8:52 pm

    Quoting catseyes23:
    A wonderfully thought out post. Thank you for sharing it, Cru.

    Cats
Why thank you Cat's, word's like that from such a writer as good as yourself are nice to hear


gypsy1629 41F

5/28/2006 10:49 pm

Cru...thanks darlin for all the wonderful information, I learned a lot more from this post than I ever knew to begin with...gonna put my American flag at half mast in the AM, yes, I know I am in an apartment but I was thinking I can hang it lower then later at noon put it back where I usually have it hanging...And the moment of silence is a given!

Say do you know at all why or when they changed it from Decoration Day to Memorial Day? No biggie I can look it up myself if you do not get back to this post...

Thank You to you and all the other Vets there are in our country! Those alive and those whom have passed.

gypsy


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/29/2006 12:05 am

    Quoting angelofmercy5:
    This was a great post Chris. My husband was in the Navy for 23 years beginning during the Vietnam war. I was with him for almost all of those years as a Navy wife. And I'm proud of him and all the others who serve our country. We ALL need to remember!
I never would have figured you for a navy wife. I honor your husband, and you. Never forget.


elysianpleasure 47M

5/29/2006 12:16 am

Thanks for this post... God Bless America... My Home Sweet Home....


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/29/2006 1:17 am

    Quoting gypsy1629:
    Cru...thanks darlin for all the wonderful information, I learned a lot more from this post than I ever knew to begin with...gonna put my American flag at half mast in the AM, yes, I know I am in an apartment but I was thinking I can hang it lower then later at noon put it back where I usually have it hanging...And the moment of silence is a given!

    Say do you know at all why or when they changed it from Decoration Day to Memorial Day? No biggie I can look it up myself if you do not get back to this post...

    Thank You to you and all the other Vets there are in our country! Those alive and those whom have passed.

    gypsy
Thank you gypsy. I'm glad I was able to pass on some unknown information to you. And as far as the flag is concered I don't think that what you have in mind will be much of a problem as long as you display her with the stars on the left side, either vertically, or horizontally. I figured I would ask all for a moment of silence because it is some thing that every person can afford, and possibly be willing to give. I checked it out and it does not give an exact date, only the year 1971, can you believe itI'll put all I can find about the cange over up. in case you care to read it all. I found it quite interesting. My favorite is the last paragraph, for it describes the moment of silence.

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. ... Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave – a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/29/2006 1:24 am

    Quoting elysianpleasure:
    Thanks for this post... God Bless America... My Home Sweet Home....
It's just something that I believe in deeply. As long as there are people who feel the way you do, there will be people like I to proudly protect this land.


southrnpeach333 50F

5/29/2006 6:40 am

Just wanted to drop by and say Thank You for your service.


rm_gerson42 52M
2419 posts
5/29/2006 7:26 am

Hey Cru, I just got your comment on my blog. Did not know you served.
Im right there with southrynpeach who just commented,
Thank you for your service to your country. Most of us have no idea of the sacrifices those who serve endure, while they serve and long after.
ger


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/29/2006 10:17 am

    Quoting southrnpeach333:
    Just wanted to drop by and say Thank You for your service.
Thank you, your post was wonderful.

Chris


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/29/2006 10:19 am

    Quoting rm_gerson42:
    Hey Cru, I just got your comment on my blog. Did not know you served.
    Im right there with southrynpeach who just commented,
    Thank you for your service to your country. Most of us have no idea of the sacrifices those who serve endure, while they serve and long after.
    ger
It was my pleasure to do that for all you who care

Never Forget


Operations Desert Storm/Desert Shield, A1c U.S.A.F. 27 Jun 1990-18 May 1992

Chris


NSAAddict 42F

5/29/2006 1:35 pm

Thanks Cru, not only for sharing this wonderful post and honoring the day as it was meant to be honored, but also for serving our country. Without brave, honorable men like yourself, we wouldn't be the country that we are. Hugs and a respectful salute to you!


gypsy1629 41F

5/29/2006 4:27 pm

Thanks for all the extra information you posted for me to read and learn about...I really, really appreciate it....

gypsy


waerlookin4fun 50M/46F

5/29/2006 5:06 pm

I feel the same way about this day as all the other's who posted. I usually go visit my grandfathers grave who served in WWll, but this year I'm too far away. I thank you for this wonderful post and for your service.


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/29/2006 5:43 pm

    Quoting NSAAddict:
    Thanks Cru, not only for sharing this wonderful post and honoring the day as it was meant to be honored, but also for serving our country. Without brave, honorable men like yourself, we wouldn't be the country that we are. Hugs and a respectful salute to you!
Thank you very much NSA, I was glad to do it for the people who care.

Chris


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/29/2006 5:48 pm

    Quoting gypsy1629:
    Thanks for all the extra information you posted for me to read and learn about...I really, really appreciate it....

    gypsy
Not a problem, I figured I knew right where to go, so it would be easier for me to do


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/29/2006 7:16 pm

    Quoting waerlookin4fun:
    I feel the same way about this day as all the other's who posted. I usually go visit my grandfathers grave who served in WWll, but this year I'm too far away. I thank you for this wonderful post and for your service.
Sorry to hear you didn't get to go. I go to my local cemetaries, to show my support. And for the people like you it makes our jobs easier.


rm_yukonpaul 51M
1120 posts
5/30/2006 6:14 am


libgemOH 56M/52F

5/30/2006 8:02 pm

Thank you! You know my son is active Air Force and you shared with me that you were too. Thank you for the information and most of all, thank you for serving us!! -B


SacredStarDance

5/30/2006 8:05 pm

cru..THANK YOU

UNDER THE STARS

under the stars
We choose to write
you choose what you comprehend.
read twice and be nice
every key stroke... has a heart beat


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/31/2006 3:35 pm

    Quoting katsback:
    great memorial cru..i did one used my dads ww2 pic...

    p.s your in paris now..
thank you Kats, I have not had much time lately to check around, but I can't wait to see your posts.


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/31/2006 3:38 pm

    Quoting rm_mzhunyhole:
    Great post..God Bless the U S A..makes me so prouud to be an American..thanks to ya and all the others like ya{=}.
There in no land as great as ours, and it all goes back to the soldiers who protect her, AND their supporters. Thank you mzhuny


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/31/2006 3:39 pm

no you could have at least said BOO, hope you are feeling ok


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/31/2006 3:42 pm

    Quoting libgemOH:
    Thank you! You know my son is active Air Force and you shared with me that you were too. Thank you for the information and most of all, thank you for serving us!! -B
I salute your son, I know exactly how scary it can be in times like these. I would serve again if I could, just to keep our lives safe.


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
5/31/2006 3:46 pm

All I can say is Thank you for your aknowledgement and support


honeypot7473 43F

6/1/2006 3:59 pm

I have to say thank you, to you and all. My uncle is a major in the army now. Both my grandfathers served, one in the air force and one in the marines. My father too, and most of my uncles. I appreciate what you guys do for us all year, and I honor you guys, all year.Again thank you.


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
6/2/2006 2:15 pm

    Quoting honeypot7473:
    I have to say thank you, to you and all. My uncle is a major in the army now. Both my grandfathers served, one in the air force and one in the marines. My father too, and most of my uncles. I appreciate what you guys do for us all year, and I honor you guys, all year.Again thank you.
I'm glad your family is so dedicated to the ideals of protecting our freedom's. Thank you for honoring all.


rm_cru1972 44M
4407 posts
6/2/2006 2:18 pm

    Quoting rm_Dysgyzed:
    Hi SugarMan!

    Sorry for the delay in comment. There's never a delay in my Honoring.

    I am a big supporter of our Military Heros...I've been very Honored to count several Nam vets as amongst my Dearest.

    And thank you too, Cru, for your time in the desert. I can only imagine the Hell and Sacrifice of that...but I am so PROUD that you stepped up...and PROUD of your Brothers too.

    I imagine a little girl there, with more of an opportunity to learn how to read because people like YOU are going in and making sure she's not terrorized into not doing so.
No worries, I realize you can be very busy. I am humbled to know that there are so many here that do appreciate what is done on a daily basis. Thank you Dysgyzed


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