The makings of a great kisser  

DiscreetFunCMH 50M
62 posts
7/31/2006 9:34 am

Last Read:
8/2/2006 9:36 am

The makings of a great kisser

I came up with this opinion 20 years ago and I'll be the first to admit that my world of experience is about the size of a 3 gallon fish bowl, but I think my reasoning is sound. Ultimately it comes down to practice and attention to detail so, at my age now and the approximate age of those most likely to view this, practice has come in many forms and the size of your fish bowl.

But, "in the beginning", what made a naturally good kisser? IMHO, a musician. Particularly, someone playing a band instrument {using your mouth, duh}. Yes, I happened to play the trumpet, and long before I ever got my first REAL kiss in high school, I had several years of practice using my mouth.

Think about it for a second. Balance of tension and pressure with the lips pressing against something and the ability to vary it in minuscule detail. Breathing control. A talented and practiced tongue {ok, so maybe that has other uses besides kissing }.

elementary band lesson... pay attention to your tongue for a second and how if feels and what it's doing differently as you say la la la la, and da da da da, and ta ta ta ta. Now what can you do with that talent and information when practiced and able to sustain for long periods of time. hmmmmmm

We may have been called "band fags" back in the day, but I think the cross training we received has been of great value over the years.

So do you agree? Am I full of BS? Or has my age caused invalidation to the theory, because there are too many other factors now? What background have the better kissers you've experienced had?

I'm prepared to go down in a blaze

Cheers,
-D


Aamu3 55M

7/31/2006 10:05 am

You may have something there, however we all use our lips on a daily basis so perhaps the results are the same but the reasons might be different from the physical elements you are refering to.
If I were to agree with you that a musician is a better kisser than say a heavy equipment operator, I would put it down more to the idea that a musician might be concidered more intouch with their emotions since they get to express themselves more through their music. Afterall what makes a great musician but someone that can throw themselves into their music for it to come alive. Just playing the notes won't do.
But then again there might be something special about the person that can handle a large piece of equipment like a front end loader, with the gentleness and care to be able to pick up an egg without breaking it.
I think it all comes down to managing to details and throwing youself into it with all you have.


Theflinkychick 105F

7/31/2006 10:07 am

I've kissed a trumpet player. And, yeah, he is the best, but I would say that paying attention to my cues is just as much a part of it as his band lessons...

Not all who wander are lost.


DiscreetFunCMH 50M

7/31/2006 12:16 pm

    Quoting Aamu3:
    You may have something there, however we all use our lips on a daily basis so perhaps the results are the same but the reasons might be different from the physical elements you are refering to.
    If I were to agree with you that a musician is a better kisser than say a heavy equipment operator, I would put it down more to the idea that a musician might be concidered more intouch with their emotions since they get to express themselves more through their music. Afterall what makes a great musician but someone that can throw themselves into their music for it to come alive. Just playing the notes won't do.
    But then again there might be something special about the person that can handle a large piece of equipment like a front end loader, with the gentleness and care to be able to pick up an egg without breaking it.
    I think it all comes down to managing to details and throwing youself into it with all you have.
point well taken. I've seen a talented HEO in action. Very masterful indeed.


DiscreetFunCMH 50M

7/31/2006 12:20 pm

    Quoting Theflinkychick:
    I've kissed a trumpet player. And, yeah, he is the best, but I would say that paying attention to my cues is just as much a part of it as his band lessons...
Ah yes. Every great musician knows it's just as important to take the cues from the conductor, other musicians, and/or the audience and to feed off that energy. Whether leading, following, or joining in a duet/ensemble, there is much more to it than a solo act.


libgemOH 56M/52F

7/31/2006 3:30 pm

Have been with men who swore they were the best kissers in the world and had the best technique. ~shuddering~ They were so worried about their technique, they just weren't there!!!

I just want a man that's all there in the moment, not worried about the technique, how his breath smells, how mine smells, none of that. Just in the moment!!! -B


DiscreetFunCMH 50M

8/1/2006 6:18 am

    Quoting libgemOH:
    Have been with men who swore they were the best kissers in the world and had the best technique. ~shuddering~ They were so worried about their technique, they just weren't there!!!

    I just want a man that's all there in the moment, not worried about the technique, how his breath smells, how mine smells, none of that. Just in the moment!!! -B
LOL oh beleive me, I'm not a self proclaimed great kisser. But I have been told that I am more than once over the years. Pretty out of practice now, so I'm not sure I could do anything but be in the moment


FrankPicasso 52M

8/2/2006 7:22 am

I think you're right on the money. You can always tell the difference between the technically masterful players and those who play from the heart. It's the little nuances, slightly varied tonal inflections, and the discreet and subtle dynamics involved. Also, I believe it is the notes not played, that is more mysterious and delightful, than the notes that are. And so it goes for horns, kissing, and any other tongue-related art forms. Cheers!


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