two countries divided by a common language  

4playman4play 62M
13 posts
5/7/2005 1:10 am

Last Read:
3/5/2006 9:27 pm

two countries divided by a common language


Just saw a handle for an attractive US lady which in the UK would mean the stuff that drops out of your bottom! I had great fun in Austin, Texas recently giving a course and explaining some of the differnces between UK and US language. I even taught them some new swear words which aren't used in the US - more fun than the course! Are there any differences that you know about?
OK I'll tell you one of them - bollocks - as in testicles. Interestingly, it can be used to specify good or bad e.g. "the dog's bollocks" means its the best, and "its a load of bollocks" means its rubbish. Try it on your "friends" today!

vengeur 41M
836 posts
5/7/2005 11:06 am

What makes me laugh is whenever somebody in the USA mentions the term "fanny pack". The anatomical areas of the body that the word "fanny" pertains to differ on each side of the Atlantic, in which that the Britons use this word to denote a woman's genitalia rather than just her buttocks like Americans do.

I also recall hearing about the uproar in the UK over a Disney film entitled "Free Willy" when it was released there, since many Britons would also take that title to mean, "Free Penis".

I believe the second film in Mike Myers' "Austin Powers" series had the latter portion of its title as "The Spy Who Shagged Me". I have wondered whether there were any objections to that over in the UK, amongst those whom are easily offended by vulgarity as such.


4playman4play 62M
13 posts
5/8/2005 1:59 am

Vengeur - I'd forgotten about fanny packs! Guys in the UK are always trying to get women from the US to talk about their fanny packs and then double up laughing. I've got to say the spy who shagged me was a bit rich for me, do you really want to explain that to a 7 year old kid! Thanks, for the comment.


vengeur 41M
836 posts
5/8/2005 12:09 pm

Have you ever heard the phrase, "Up yer Ronson" before? In the USA, Ronson was a company which sold gadgets on TV years ago.


4playman4play 62M
13 posts
5/9/2005 12:30 am

"Up yer Ronson" is a new one on me! The best one is a "V" sign so the index and middle finger stick up with the back of the hand pointed towards the guy you're doing it to (opposite to Churchill's "V" sign). This means fuck off - coming from the English bowmen at Agincourt when the French cut off these two fingers to stop them firing the bows! So the English gave them the "V" sign to show they still had the fingers - suggest you don't do it in the UK if you want to keep your teeth!


vengeur 41M
836 posts
5/9/2005 7:39 am

Somehow, the way to express "fuck off" in the USA with one's hand became just the middle finger alone extended upwards. I know about the UK way to express this, trust me. Your historical origin explanantion was rather interesting, however, so thanks for that.

Perhaps you could shed some light on this for me then - did the word "pussy" have a different and not-so-vulgar meaning in Britain in the days of yesteryear? I recall reading years ago that it once was a term used to refer to old women, but that was just in one article in some XXX magazine.


4playman4play 62M
13 posts
5/10/2005 7:49 am

Vengeur

No idea as to the origins of pussy - but I did find this on the web:
The ever popular word pussy has referred to the female genitalia for at least four hundred years but at the same time and in, one assumes, different circles, it was also used to refer to a young girl. Victorian fathers could refer to their daughters as puss or pussy as in "'What do you think, pussy?' said her father to Eva" in Uncle Tom's Cabin. Surely that quote proves that there are no objective standards and obscenity, blasphemy, and vulgarity exist only the mind of the prude and are as about as inconstant as the weather.
Cheers


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